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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Richardson-Owens-Thomas House

Marquis De Lafayette

 
 
Richardson-Owens-Thomas House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 30, 2009
1. Richardson-Owens-Thomas House Marker
Inscription.
In this house
designed by the Architect William Jay in early 1800 Marquis De Lafayette was the guest of the City of Savannah March 19-21, 1825. A friend of Washington and a defender of American liberty

" Until now,sir,
you have only seen my ardor
in your cause; and that
may not, perhaps, be useless.
I shall purchase a ship which
will carry out your officers.
It is necessary to show
confidence in the future, and
it is in the hour of danger that
I love to share your fortune. "
Lafayette to Silas Deane
Paris, France 1776

[ Emblem - Savannah Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution ]
1931

 
Erected 1931 by D.A.R. Savannah Chapter.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 32° 4.638′ N, 81° 5.367′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on Abercorn Street., on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located between E. President & State Streets. Marker is at or near this postal address: 124 Abercorn Street., Savannah GA 31401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Richardson-Owens-Thomas House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 30, 2009
2. Richardson-Owens-Thomas House Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Owens-Thomas House (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Owens-Thomas House (here, next to this marker); Moravian Colonists In Savannah (within shouting distance of this marker); Barnard House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gen. James Jackson Home Site (about 400 feet away); Conrad Aiken (about 400 feet away); 1812 Wesley Chapel (about 400 feet away); Colonial Town Gate (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Savannah.
 
Regarding Richardson-Owens-Thomas House. Just after Christmas, 1817, the young English architect, William Jay, reached Savannah and supervised construction of the house he had designed for cotton broker Richard Richardson. This outstanding example of Regency architecture is one of several important houses designed by Jay before he left the United States in 1824. In 1825, the Marquis de
Lafayette visited Savannah and spoke from this glorious house. It is a memorable experience to stand in the dining room on a sunny day with sunlight pouring through the amber glass onto silver, brass and mahogany. Miss Meta Thomas, granddaughter of a previous owner, George W. Owens, willed the house to the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences for a
house museum. The house and even the kitchen below have period
Richardson-Owens-Thomas House image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 30, 2009
3. Richardson-Owens-Thomas House
furnishings. 124 Abercorn Street.

--Visitor's Guide to Savannah
 
Also see . . .
1. Owens-Thomas House. Three rare built-in marble-top tables are among the only surviving objects from the original owners, the Richardsons. (Submitted on June 10, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Silas Deane- the United States' first foreign diplomat. On arriving in Paris, Deane at once opened negotiations with Vergennes and Beaumarchais, securing through the latter the shipment of many shiploads of arms and munitions of war to America, and helping finance the Battle of Ticonderoga. He also enlisted the services of a number of Continental soldiers of fortune, among whom were Lafayette, Baron Johann de Kalb, Thomas Conway, Casimir Pulaski, and Baron von Steuben. (Submitted on June 10, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Patriots & Patriotism
 
Richardson-Owens-Thomas House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 16, 2008
4. Richardson-Owens-Thomas House Marker
Richardson-Owens-Thomas House image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey Lawrence Bradley - Photographer, 1936
5. Richardson-Owens-Thomas House
April, 5, 1936 FRONT ELEVATION WEST HABS GA,26-SAV,7-1
Richardson-Owens-Thomas House Marker image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey Branan Sanders, Photographer, 1934
6. Richardson-Owens-Thomas House Marker
March REAR VIEW (SOUTHEAST) HABS GA,26-SAV,7-4
Richardson-Owens-Thomas House image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey Lawrence Bradley - Photographer, 1936
7. Richardson-Owens-Thomas House
April, 5, 1936 RIGHT SIDE VIEW SOUTH HABS GA,26-SAV,7-5
Richardson-Owens-Thomas House image. Click for full size.
Historical American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer, 1936
8. Richardson-Owens-Thomas House
Dec. 30, 1936 SIDE PORCH (SOUTH) HABS GA,26-SAV,7-6
in 1825 the Revolutionary War hero, the Marquis de Layfayette, was a guest. According to Savannah's oral tradition, the celebrated Frenchman delivered his two Savannah addresses to thousands of adoring citizens from the ornate cast iron balcony on the south side of the house.
Richardson-Owens-Thomas House National Register of Historical Places Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 30, 2009
9. Richardson-Owens-Thomas House National Register of Historical Places Marker
Owens-Thomas House *** (added 1976 - Building - #76000611) Also known as Richardson-Owens-Thomas House 124 Abercorn St., Savannah Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering Architect, builder, or engineer: Jay,William Architectural Style: Early Republic, Other Area of Significance: Architecture Period of Significance: 1800-1824, 1825-1849 Owner: Private , Local Gov't Historic Function: Domestic Historic Sub-function: Single Dwelling Current Function: Recreation And Culture Current Sub-function: Museum
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,495 times since then and 84 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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