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Anderson in Anderson County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Anderson County Courthouse Annex Park

 
 
Anderson County Courthouse Annex Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 26, 2009
1. Anderson County Courthouse Annex Park Marker
Inscription.
The location of the Anderson County Courthouse Annex on the corner of Fant and River Street has unique significance to Anderson's history. The site is the location of the 1865 federal encampment of the First Maine, 33rd Regiment, United States Colored Troops (USCT), a military unit composed of African American soldiers. The encampment included the terrain where historic McCant's Middle School now stands, continuing to the corner of Fant and River Streets. The First Marine troops, 33rd Regiment consisted of freed men under the command of white officers. The officers were housed at the Benson Hotel in town and eventually, the soldiers were garrisoned at Johnson Female University.

During a period of time directly after the ending of the Civil War, Anderson had African American troops garrisoned to maintain law and order. This era was referred to as "Presidential Reconstruction." It began with the surrender of the Confederate government and ended with the Congressional Reconstruction.

The era reflected the lawlessness of the time period when the story of Anderson County native Manse Jolly, a returning veteran of Company F, First SC Calvary, grew to be a South Carolina legend when his bold escapes of revenge against Union forces. Manse Jolly left Anderson County to start a new life in Milam County, Texas, and died
Anderson County Courthouse Annex Park -<br>Fant Street in the Background image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 26, 2009
2. Anderson County Courthouse Annex Park -
Fant Street in the Background
in a flooded river.

Very few references regarding the occupation exist; however, the diaries of Andersonian Emmala Reed give a view of occupied Anderson in this period. Emmala wrote "my alma mater (Johnson University), now sold by our vile Maine garrison - as a Yankee hospital - desecrated."

Another source are the papers of Lt. Col. Charles Taylor Trowbridge, who was the commander of the First Maine, 33rd Regiment, USCT, who were stationed in Anderson on August 14, 1865. Colonel Trowbridge faced many challenges to restore order in the three counties of Pickens, Oconee, and Anderson, and survived several close encounters with Manse Jolly, who threatened to kill him. The First Maine left Anderson in September 1865.
 
Erected 2008 by Anderson County and the Sons of Confederate Veterans, Manse Jolly Camp #6.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Sons of Confederate Veterans/United Confederate Veterans marker series.
 
Location. 34° 30.067′ N, 82° 38.667′ W. Marker is in Anderson, South Carolina, in Anderson County. Marker is at the intersection of South Fant Street (South Carolina Route 22) and East River Street (U.S. 76), on the right when traveling north on South Fant Street. Click for map. Marker is located
Anderson County Courthouse Annex Park and Marker -<br>River Street in the Background image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 26, 2009
3. Anderson County Courthouse Annex Park and Marker -
River Street in the Background
in the park located west of the courthouse annex building. Marker is at or near this postal address: 401 East River Street, Greenville SC 29601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. William Law Watkins (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); William Bullein Johnson (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Living Tribute (approx. 0.2 miles away); St. John's Methodist Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); The First Baptist Church Bell (approx. 0.2 miles away); G. Ross Anderson Jr. Federal Building and United States Courthouse (approx. 0.2 miles away); Historic Wilhite House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Grace Episcopal Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Masonic Temple -- 1889 (approx. 0.3 miles away); In Commemoration of Black Pioneers (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Anderson.
 
Also see . . .
1. Anderson County Courthouse Annex Park dedicated. Kelly Jo Barnwell was excited to attend the Anderson County Courthouse Annex Park dedication on Friday because she knows the seniors she works with will visit the park frequently. (Submitted on June 10, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. United States Colored Troops. The United States Colored Troops (USCT) were regiments of the United States Army during the American Civil
Manse Jolly image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, circa 1863
4. Manse Jolly
War that were composed of African-American soldiers. (Submitted on June 10, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. United States Colored Troops: A Short History. Before Fort Sumter, South Carolina was fired upon on April 12, 1861, seven states in the deep south had seceded from the Union, and a Convention was held in Montgomery, Alabama which adopted a Constitution and elected Jefferson Davis as President of the Confederate States of America. (Submitted on June 10, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Manson Sherrill Jolly. Articles about Manson Sherrill Jolly. (Submitted on June 10, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Sons of the Confederate Veterans, Manse Jolly, Camp #6. Official website of the Sons of the Confederate Veterans, Manse Jolly, Camp #6. (Submitted on June 10, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Manse Jolly rides again ... in court. Nearly 140 years after he died, Anderson County’s legendary Civil War hero Manson Sherrill Jolly, better known as Manse Jolly is at the center of a civil war that could be fought out in an Oconee County courtroom. (Submitted on June 10, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Charles Taylor Trowbridge. Charles W. Trowbridge was born in Morristown, Morris County, New Jersey in an
Col. Charles T. Trowbridge<br>(d. 1907) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, circa 1863
5. Col. Charles T. Trowbridge
(d. 1907)
area known as Trowbridge Mountain. (Submitted on June 10, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. Col. Charles T. Trowbridge: Sketch of the Republican Candidate for State Prison Inspector. The nomination of Col. Charles T. Trowbridge, of Brooklyn, by the Republican State Convention on Wednesday last for State Prison Inspector is very gratifying to the electors of Kings County. (Submitted on June 10, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. First South Carolina Cavalry: A Unit History. The First South Carolina Regiment of Cavalry as formed in 1861 and ordered up to Northern Virginia in the fall of 1862. (Submitted on June 10, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

10. First South Carolina Cavalry: Company F Roster. Complete roster of Company F. (Submitted on June 10, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Manse Jolly
The exploits of Manse Jolly, the Confederate who never surrendered, have become legendary in the Anderson area. Jolly was the most wanted man in western South Carolina, the United States Army not only having a price on his head, but often sending out detachments from the Federal garrison in Anderson to being him back dead or alive.

Of the seven sons of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Manse Jolly House<br>Manse Jolly Road image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
6. Manse Jolly House
Manse Jolly Road
Moorhead Jolly of the Lebanon community, three died in battle and one of battle wounds. Manse joined Company F, 1st Regiment, South Carolina Cavalry, on December 4, 1861, at Pickens. Last official record of his military career on file with Confederate records in Washington states he answered roll call in December 1864. When he arrived home from the battlefront after Lee's surrender, he found Anderson occupied by a Yankee garrison with troops encamped off East Boundary Street (later Fant Street, in the area which became Nardin's Field and now the site of McCants Junior High School), and officers quartered in the dormitory on University Hill. On his oath to kill five Yankees for every brother lost on the battlefield he more than made good. He and his unsurrendered Confederate companions lost no time in playing a hide-and-seek game with the commander who sent out squads when he found one of his men killed. They often encountered Jolly and lost one or two of their number. When Jolly's Spencer carbine or Colt's six shooter spoke, it meant business. Eventually more soldiers were sent to Anderson to hunt for the desperado but they never got him. When an old well in the Hopewell community was cleaned out in the early 1900s, it yielded a number of skeletons and a like number of brass belt buckles bearing the U.S.A. insignia.

When Jolly, having 23 notches on his gun handle, decided
Manse Jolly House image. Click for full size.
By Evelyn Holton Melvin, Anderson County Sketches, 1969
7. Manse Jolly House
Sketch made after renovation by David J. Watson of Clemson.
to leave for Texas, he did it in characteristic fashion, riding boldly into Anderson in broad daylight on Jan. 29, 1865, then dashed through the Yankee camp blazing away with six shooter in each hand. Taken by surprise and thinking he was in the vanguard of a band of raiders, the troops panicked.

On the way to Texas, it is said that Jolly killed a dozen more Yankees. But his career ended shortly thereafter; his grave is in the Little River cemetery near Cameron, Texas, the headstone bearing the Masonic emblem. The headstone states that Manse Jolly drowned in Walker's Creek, in Milam County, at the age of 29. His faithful horse, Dixie, drowned with him. (Source: Anderson County Sketches editied by Elizabeth Belser Fuller (1969).)
    — Submitted January 30, 2012, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Notable PersonsNotable PlacesWar, US Civil
 
Manse Jolly House Drive Post<br>Note Initials "MJ" image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
8. Manse Jolly House Drive Post
Note Initials "MJ"
Manse Jolly House Drive Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, January 30, 2012
9. Manse Jolly House Drive Entrance
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,566 times since then and 372 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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