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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charlottesville, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Charlottesville

 
 
Charlottesville Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 2, 2009
1. Charlottesville Marker
Inscription. The site was patented by William Taylor in 1737. The town was established by law in 1762, and was named for Queen Charlotte, wife of George III. Burgoyne’s army, captured at Saratoga in 1777, was long quartered near here. The legislature was in session here, in June 1781, but retired westward to escape Tarleton’s raid on the town. Jefferson, who lived at Monticello, founded the University of Virginia in 1819.
 
Erected 1929 by Conservation and Development Commission. (Marker Number Q-1a.)
 
Location. 38° 2.164′ N, 78° 27.695′ W. Marker is in Charlottesville, Virginia. Marker is on Long Street (Bypass U.S. 250) north of High Street (Business U.S. 250), on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1305 Long St, Charlottesville VA 22901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Clark’s Birthplace (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Farm (approx. 0.7 miles away); Jack Jouett’s Ride (approx. 0.9 miles away); Site of Old Swan Tavern (approx. 0.9 miles away); Watering Fountains (approx. 0.9 miles away); Historic Courthouse Square
Charlottesville Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 2, 2009
2. Charlottesville Marker
(approx. 0.9 miles away); Monticello (approx. 0.9 miles away); Albemarle Confederate Monument (approx. 0.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Charlottesville.
 
Also see . . .  Charlottesville: A Brief Urban History. “The University of Virginia was founded in 1819. As the institution’s founder and principal visionary, Thomas Jefferson selected the site atop a small hill one mile from the center of town. The placement of the university away from the city established the “Academical Village” as distinct from the activities of town life. Jefferson's suspicions about the city and his clear preference for an agrarian basis of society in the newly formed republic are well documented, and it clearly influenced his attitude toward the founding of a non-sectarian and state supported institution of higher education. The University's location "outside of town" profoundly affected the subsequent urban development of Charlottesville by providing a strong westward focus of development, particularly along Three Notch’d Road (Main Street) connecting the University to the west and the town’s center to the east. A small commercial area called The Corner developed adjacent to the
Panorama of Monticello (1772) image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, February 2, 2008
3. Panorama of Monticello (1772)
University, supporting the student and faculty population as the institution grew.” (Submitted on June 10, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Political Subdivisions
 
The Rotunda (1826) image. Click for full size.
By Paul Crumlish, October 15, 2011
4. The Rotunda (1826)
The centerpiece of the University of Virginia, it was designed by Thomas Jefferson, destroyed by a fire it was renovated by Stanford White in 1898. It was last renovated to Jefferson’s design in 1976.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 763 times since then and 67 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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