Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ticonderoga in Essex County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Summit of Mount Defiance

 
 
Summit of Mount Defiance Marker #1 image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
1. Summit of Mount Defiance Marker #1
Inscription.
Marker #1:
Two historic waterways converge at Ticonderoga. Long before the region became important to European powers, Native Americans made a portage here for carrying canoes and gear between Lake George and Lake Champlain. The five-mile-long La Chute River flows out of Lake George, (behind the mountain to your left), and joins Lake Champlain in the estuary below. The river, whose name means “the falls” in French, powered a French sawmill during construction of Fort Carillon (renamed Ticonderoga by the British in 1759) in the mid-18th century, and an impressive array of mills and factories in the 19th century.

Marker #2:
The Fort Ticonderoga peninsula reaches east towards Mount Independence on the Vermont shore to form a choke point. Here, two waterways from the south converge, flowing north to the Saint Lawrence River. Whoever controlled this passage controlled travel between New York and Nouvelle France (Canada). American troops connected the two fortified positions with a floating bridge built during the winter of 1776-77. East Creek, on the far side of Mount Independence, protected retreating American troops from a flanking German attack in July of 1777, allowing them to regroup and fight again at Hubbardton and Bennington.

Marker #3:
From the vantage point on this mountain
Summit of Mount Defiance Marker #2 image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
2. Summit of Mount Defiance Marker #2
top, Robert Rogers and his Ranger scouts reconnoitered the strength of Fort Carillon (Ticonderoga) during the Seven Years’ War when the French and British struggled for control of North America. Lake Champlain served as the highway for military transport into the heart of the country. Both nations understood that control of the lake was the key to success.

Mount Defiance is owned and preserved by Fort Ticonderoga, a private, not-for-profit educational institution open to the public since 1909.

Marker #4:
Lake Champlain reaches another twenty-five miles south to Whitehall, where American shipwrights constructed a small fleet of ships during the summer of 1776. Sailors rowed the finished hulls to Ticonderoga, stepped their masts against the cliff at Mount Independence on the Vermont shore, and installed fittings and rigging in the shelter of Fort Ticonderoga. This first American navy lost to a superior British force at Valcour Island, but held the British off long enough to force them back to Canada for the winter.

Mount Independence is preserved through the partnership of Fort Ticonderoga and the State of Vermont.
 
Erected by Fort Ticonderoga National Historic Landmark.
 
Location. 43° 49.881′ N, 73° 24.382′ 
Summit of Mount Defiance Marker #3 image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
3. Summit of Mount Defiance Marker #3
W. Marker is in Ticonderoga, New York, in Essex County. Marker can be reached from Mt. Defiance Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Markers are in a picnic pavilion at the summit of Mount Defiance. Marker is in this post office area: Ticonderoga NY 12883, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Old Military Road (approx. 0.9 miles away); Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Defiance (approx. one mile away in Vermont); From this point south… (approx. 1.1 miles away); Eighteen Colonial Soldiers (approx. 1.1 miles away); A Soldier of France (approx. 1.1 miles away); Mount Defiance (approx. 1.1 miles away but has been reported missing); Fort Carillon (approx. 1.1 miles away); Colonel John Brown (approx. 1.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Ticonderoga.
 
More about this marker. Each of the four markers contain a map of the region showing Mount Defiance, Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Independence on Lake Champlain. The location of the markers is also indicated. Maps are produced by Fort Ticonderoga with support from the Lake Champlain Basin Program. A French translation of the marker text appears on each marker as well.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Ticonderoga National Historic Landmark. (Submitted on June 12, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
Summit of Mount Defiance Marker #4 image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
4. Summit of Mount Defiance Marker #4

 
Categories. War, French and IndianWar, US RevolutionaryWaterways & Vessels
 
Marker in the Mount Defiance Picnic Pavilion image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
5. Marker in the Mount Defiance Picnic Pavilion
Marker on Mount Defiance image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
6. Marker on Mount Defiance
Lake Champlain and the Vermont shore. image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
7. Lake Champlain and the Vermont shore.
View from the Summit of Mount Defiance image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
8. View from the Summit of Mount Defiance
Fort Ticonderoga (left) and Mount Independence can be seen in this photo taken from near the markers. British artillery positioned here forced the Americans to abandon these two forts in July of 1777.
Mount Defiance as seen from Fort Ticonderoga image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
9. Mount Defiance as seen from Fort Ticonderoga
The markers are located at the summit of this mountain, overlooking Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Independence.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,693 times since then and 135 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement