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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Theodore Roosevelt Island in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mason Mansion about 1900

 
 
Mason Mansion about 1900 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 8, 2008
1. Mason Mansion about 1900 Marker
Inscription.
John Mason* had an elegant summer home on the small rise you see behind the sign. From about 1792 to 1830 it was a center of Washington and Georgetown society. A few bricks are all that remain of its former splendor.

*Son of George Mason, author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights.

La lujosa casa de veraneo de John Mason* estaba situada en la pequeña elevación que se encuentra detras de este letrero. Desde 1792 hasta 1830 fué uno de los centros de reunión de la sociedad de Washington y Georgetown. Hoy sólo quedan unos cuantos ladrillos como testimonio de su antiguo esplendor.

*Hijo de George Mason, autor de la Declaración de Derechos de Virginia.
 
Location. 38° 53.685′ N, 77° 3.753′ W. Marker is in Theodore Roosevelt Island, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from George Washington Parkway, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located along a foot trail in Theodore Roosevelt Island National Memorial. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20037, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Mason Estate (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Theodore Roosevelt (approx. 0.2 miles away); American Indian Villages and Captain John Smith
Mason Mansion about 1900 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 8, 2008
2. Mason Mansion about 1900 Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away in Virginia); Fort Haggerty (approx. 0.3 miles away in Virginia); Causeway (approx. 0.4 miles away); A Canal to the West - Tide Lock (approx. 0.4 miles away); Herring Highway (approx. half a mile away); History Of The U. S. Marine Corps (approx. half a mile away in Virginia). Click for a list of all markers in Theodore Roosevelt Island.
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
View of the Trail, the Marker, and the Rise Where the House Stood image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 8, 2008
3. View of the Trail, the Marker, and the Rise Where the House Stood
General John Mason House image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress - HABS
4. General John Mason House
Photo by an unknown photographer of the John Mason House on Analostan Island apparently taken between 1880 and 1890.
The Mason Family on Mason's Island image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress - HABS
5. The Mason Family on Mason's Island
“From 1717-1833 the prominent Mason family of Virginia owned Theodore Roosevelt Island, and during this period it began to be referred to as Mason's island. Upon his father's death in 1735, George Mason IV inherited the property and later became a wealthy planter and revolutionary statesman, best remembered as the author of the 1776 Virginia Constitution and Declaration of Rights. He did not settle on the Island, but in 1748 established a ferry between Georgetown on the Maryland side of the Potomac and a ferry house on the island's north shore. After George Mason IV died in 1792, the island passed to his fourth son, John Mason, who built a large classical revival-style mansion there ca. 1800. The house, set atop the island's highest point, was the centerpiece of the functioning plantations and pleasure gardens John Mason developed on the site. The northern section of the island held the commercial plantations, and visitors approached the house via a wide alee. The Mason family's personal gardens were located to the south, where they grew food consumed on the property and entertained prominent guests. John Mason also authorized construction of Mason's causeway, which by ca. 1807 connected the island's northwest corner with the Virginia shore. Following a series of financial setbacks, Mason sold the island in 1833, ending his family's tenure.” — HABS (map based on Robert King, "A Map of the City of Washington," 1818)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 824 times since then and 62 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   5. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on April 14, 2017.
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