Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gainesville in Prince William County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Rock Fight

 
 
Rock Fight Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 1, 2007
1. Rock Fight Marker
Inscription. In Aug. 1862, during the Second Battle of Manassas, Confederate Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s command occupied an unfinished railroad grade northeast of here, including “the Dump,” a gap in the grade heaped with construction stone. On 30 Aug., the Federals attacked, the 24th New York Infantry almost broke through. Out of ammunition, Confederates there and at Deep Cut to the west, began hurling rocks. Some startled Federals threw stones back before retreating as Jackson reinforced his line. The Rock Fight became a Southern legend.
 
Erected 2003 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number C 33.)
 
Location. 38° 47.305′ N, 77° 38.356′ W. Marker is in Gainesville, Virginia, in Prince William County. Marker is on Lee Highway (U.S. 29), on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Gainesville VA 20155, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Campaign of Second Manassas (here, next to this marker); Bull Run Battlefields (here, next to this marker); Second Battle of Manassas (here, next to this marker); The Macrae School
Four State Markers Along Lee Highway image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 1, 2007
2. Four State Markers Along Lee Highway
(approx. 1.1 miles away); Battle of Buckland Mills (approx. 1.5 miles away); St. Paul's, Episcopal (approx. 1.5 miles away); Haymarket During the War (approx. 1.7 miles away); Haymarket During the Civil War (approx. 1.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Gainesville.
 
More about this marker. A marker with this same number but titled “Second Battle of Manassas,” discussed the rock fight. It was erected in the late 1920s or early 1930s 3½ miles east of Gainsville on what is now US 29. It read “Half a mile north, along a railway cut, Stonewall Jackson held position, August 29-30, 1862, repulsing all of Pope’s assaults. When ammunition gave out on a section of the Confederate line, the soldiers used stones as missiles. Late in the afternoon of August 30, when Longstreet attacked, Jackson swept southward, completing the victory.” Its current location is nowhere near the rock fight. —Ed.
 
Also see . . .  Action at the Deep Cut. A first hand account by Colonel Robert M. Mayo, 47th Virginia Infantry Regiment. (Submitted on August 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
A Portion of the "Unfinished Railroad" Running Through the Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 24, 2007
3. A Portion of the "Unfinished Railroad" Running Through the Battlefield
 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,571 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement