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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greenville in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Come On In, the Water's Fine!

 
 
Come On In, the Water's Fine! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, June 14, 2009
1. Come On In, the Water's Fine! Marker
Inscription.
"All summer, everyone came up here and lay in the sun and carried on," recalls Mary Ann Epps McCullough, who, along with other lifeguards in the 1940s, "would swim to the dam and back every day."

July 4 brought Aquatic Day festivities with races and a diving clown. Spectators cheered as lifeguards stood on boats, using bamboo poles to knock each other into the water. One year, 4th of July attendance totaled 1,400 people.

All of this occurred in what was originally simply "Reservoir 2." In fact, down near the boat dock, a coal-powered pump once sent water from here to Greenville's homes.

Just as fashions have changed so have park regulations. Originally, this was a white-only facility. The park system even closed briefly rather than integrate. Then, in the early 1960s, "whites would leave at 1 p.m. Blacks would arrive after 2 p.m." (quote from Ed Miller, Jr.).
 
Location. 34° 55.633′ N, 82° 22.167′ W. Marker is in Greenville, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker can be reached from State Park Road. Click for map. Marker is on the grounds of Paris Mountain State Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2401 State Park Road, Greenville SC 29609, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured
Come On In, the Water's Fine! Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, June 14, 2009
2. Come On In, the Water's Fine! Marker
as the crow flies. New Life for Old Bathhouse (within shouting distance of this marker); "Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?" (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to Paris Mountain State Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Open to the Sky (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); What's So Special About this Bridge? (about 500 feet away); The Dam for Reservoir 2 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Barracks in the Woods (approx. mile away); Sulphur Spring (approx. 0.9 miles away); The Original Water Filter (approx. 0.9 miles away); Bull's Eye! (approx. 1.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Greenville.
 
More about this marker. It is the 2nd marker in the park's Wayside Marker's Trail.
 
Also see . . .
1. Paris Mountain State Park. A renovated historic bathhouse serves as the new hub of activities at popular Paris Mountain State Park. (Submitted on June 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Paris Mountain State Park. Paris Mountain State Park is a park located north of Greenville, South Carolina. (Submitted on June 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Paris Mountain State Park Historic District. Paris Mountain is significant for its association with the establishment and development of a system
Lake Placid Swimming Area image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, June 14, 2009
3. Lake Placid Swimming Area
of state parks in South Carolina. (Submitted on June 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Park Lakes
Lake Placid is the man-made feature that forms the core of the park's design. It is one of three lakes in the park that were constructed by the Paris Mountain Water Company and used as reservoirs for the city of Greenville. The Lake Placid complex includes the stone dam, the CCC built lakeside nature trail, and a diving platform. All of these structures are property types associated with recreation and conservation.

Lake Placid was originally built as "Reservoir #2" by the Paris Mountain Water Company between 1888 and 1898. It is constructed of coursed ashlar topped with blocks of square granite. A central spillway allowed excess water to flow over the top and front of the dam and into the steam below. Two other reservoirs, built by the Paris Mountain Water Company between 1888 and 1904 using similar construction techniques exist in the park. These are the Mountain Lake and Lake Buckhorn reservoirs. (Source: National Register nomination form.)
    — Submitted June 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. African AmericansLandmarksMan-Made FeaturesNatural Resources
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 985 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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