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Boalsburg in Centre County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Ordnance QF, 4.5-inch Howitzer Mark II

Pennsylvania Military Museum

 
 
Ordnance QF, 4.5-inch Howitzer Mark II Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2009
1. Ordnance QF, 4.5-inch Howitzer Mark II Marker
Inscription. British commanders who has fought in the Boer War in South Africa, 1899 to 1903, were impressed with the success of the enemy's howitzers. After five years, the British army approved its own new howitzer. The 4.5-inch howitzers remained in service for 35 years and saw action in both World War I and World War II. The howitzer also served Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. These two guns and limber most likely served with the Canadian Army.

About the Ordnance QF 4.5-inch Howitzer
Weight: 972 lbs.
Caliber: 4.5 inch
Maximum Range: 7,300 yards
Projectile weight: 35 lbs.
Maximum elevation: 45 degrees
Total number produced: 3,359
 
Location. 40° 46.858′ N, 77° 47.807′ W. Marker is in Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, in Centre County. Marker is on Old Boalsburg Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Located in the parking lot for the Pennsylvania Military Museum and 28th Infantry Division Shrine. Marker is in this post office area: Boalsburg PA 16827, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. M59 Armored Personnel Carrier (within shouting distance of this marker); 103rd Engineers (within shouting distance of this marker); Twin 40mm Self-propelled Gun, M42A1 Duster
The Howitzer and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2009
2. The Howitzer and Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); M4A1(76)W General Sherman Tank (within shouting distance of this marker); Headquarters Troop 28th Division (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); 28th Division Shrine (about 300 feet away); Coshocton Train Wreck (about 400 feet away); M114A2 Towed 155mm Howitzer (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Boalsburg.
 
More about this marker. Photos of the howitzer in the field carry the captions:
The howitzer brought deadly power to the battlefield. Elevated to 45 degrees, it could drop rounds almost straight down onto enemy fortifications that could not be hit by direct fire.

Horses pulled the first Mark I howitzers like the one shown here during World War I, into battle. In 1938, the British Army adapted the howitzer for mechanized towing. The York, Pennsylvania, firm of Martin-Parry produced the conversion kits for all British field guns mechanized in 1938.
 
Also see . . .  Ordnance QF, 4.5-inch Howitzer. Wikipedia article offering technical details and
Front View of the Howitzer image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2009
3. Front View of the Howitzer
Conforming with standards used at the time, the howitzer incorporated a shield for the men working on the gun.
history of the howitzer. (Submitted on June 23, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, World IWar, World II
 
Back of Howitzer image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2009
4. Back of Howitzer
Prominent here is the breech mechanism (with the breech block removed here to "demilitarize" the gun for display). To the left of the breech is an elevation wheel. The howitzer was traversed by moving the trail at the back, just like older guns from the 19th century.
Gun Limber image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 23, 2009
5. Gun Limber
Also much like the 19th century guns, the howitzer was issued with a limber.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,886 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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