Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Marcos in Hays County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

El Camino De Nacogdoches

 
 
El Camino De Nacogdoches Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, July 2003
1. El Camino De Nacogdoches Marker
Inscription. The gulley seen about fifty yards behind this marker originated from ruts in the El Camino Real (the Royal Road) from San Antonio to Nacogdoches. The road actually had two routes through what is now Hays County, and, creating confusion, both had different names at different times. By the 1790s the main path had changed course from El Camino de los Tejas (today's Hunter Road) to this location (El Camino de Nacogdoches) to align with a new crossing of the Trinity River and a new approach to Nacogdoches.

After 1800 new communities and military posts were added along El Camino Real, among them San Marcos de Neve, Puesta del Colorado (Bastrop), and Trinidad de Salcedo. The archeological site of San Marcos de Neve is located 2.2 miles east, near the San Marcos Rivers crossing.

Early in the 19th century El Camino de Nacogdoches became an important immigration route. Later, as counties were founded, this road became the boundary between many of them. It remains the southern boundary of Hays County east of the San Marcos River. But in 1858 the legislature moved the western portion farther south, perhaps hoping to thwart attempts to relocate the county seat from the town of San Marcos. Elsewhere, portions of this timeworn route were cross-fenced and abandoned. Locally, today's Old Bastrop Road preserves a segment of El Camino
Looking southwest. Ruts visible in pasture, left of picture. image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, July 10, 2003
2. Looking southwest. Ruts visible in pasture, left of picture.
de Nacogdoches and is still in use.
 
Erected 1998 by Preservation Associates, Inc., an umbrella organization that includes the Heritage Association of San Marcos, San Marcos Convention and Visitors Bureau, Hays County Historical Commission, Tanger Outlet Mall, Terry Gilmore, Al Lowman, Don Leggitt and Hill Rylander.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail marker series.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 29° 50.187′ N, 97° 55.484′ W. Marker was in San Marcos, Texas, in Hays County. Marker was on Old Bastrop Highway, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker was in this post office area: San Marcos TX 78666, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this location, measured as the crow flies. Gen. Antonio Gaona’s 1836 Campaign (approx. 1.1 miles away but has been reported missing); The Cattle Drives (approx. 1.8 miles away); Don Felipe Roque de la Portilla (approx. 2.1 miles away); Site of the First Town of San Marcos (approx. 2.1 miles away); Charles Lewis McGehee Cabin (approx. 2.1 miles away);
Marker still missing image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, October 5, 2013
3. Marker still missing
On 10/5/2013 I visited the site of this marker and confirmed the entire marker -- pole and sign -- are still missing. Can only speculate that the marker was removed on purpose for some "valid reason", e.g. by request of the land owner, to prevent say fence-hopping to inspect the ruts.
Col. Ignacio Elizondo’s 1813 Campaign (approx. 2.2 miles away); McGehee Crossing (approx. 2.9 miles away but has been reported missing); The Calaboose (approx. 3.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in San Marcos.
 
Also see . . .
1. ENV’s Old San Antonio Road report leads to Hays County historical markers. An article about the dedication of this and six other historical markers along El Camino De Nacogdoches. (Submitted on July 1, 2009.) 

2. El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail. This trail is part of El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail. Link provides more detail including map. (Submitted on March 14, 2012, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Ruts still visible.
Ruts are best viewed by clicking on the map, switching to satellite view, then zooming in. Ruts run parallel to road, Old Bastrop Highway.
    — Submitted June 26, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.

 
Categories. Hispanic AmericansNative AmericansRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
Panorama of where marker was, with ruts somewhat visible from road. image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
4. Panorama of where marker was, with ruts somewhat visible from road.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 2,182 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   3, 4. submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement