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Fort Recovery in Mercer County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Fort Recovery Monument

 
 
Fort Recovery Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 5, 2009
1. Fort Recovery Monument Marker
View of historical marker on the west side of the monument
Inscription. [West side of Monument]
This monument was erected by the Congress to commemorate the valor and perpetuate the memory of the heroic soldiers who were slain in those two memorable conflicts of the North West Territory the defeat of Arthur St. Clair and the victory of Anthony Wayne.
It marks the sacred spot where lie buried the fallen heroes who so bravely met and gallantly fought the savage foe; who as advance guards entered the wilderness of the west to blaze the way for freedom and civilization; who sacrificed home and life to the great duty of securing for a future inheritance vast dominions and great institutions.
It stands as a loving tribute of a people in grateful appreciation of the undaunted courage and patriotic devotion of the illustrious dead; and may this lofty shaft forever proclaim the glorious achievements and undying fame of the Heroes of seventeen hundred and ninety-one and seventeen hundred and ninety-four.

[South side of Monument]
This Monument
Was erected by the Congress
A. D., 1912

[East side of Monument]
Major General Arthur St. Clair Commander-In-Chief of the American Army with fifteen hundred regulars and volunteers from Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, and that section of the North West Territory which comprises
Fort Recovery Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 5, 2009
2. Fort Recovery Monument Marker
View of historical marker on the west side of the monument, along with the statue of the frontiersman that is facing westward.
the states of Ohio and Indiana, marched from Fort Washington, now Cincinnati, in September of 1791 to subdue the Indians, who, under British influence, had committed many hostilities.
After a long weary march they reached the head waters of the Wabash River, where before daybreak on the following morning November 4th 1791, they were surprised and attacked by two thousand Indians of the Miami, Delaware, Pawnee, Shawnee, Wyandot, Seneca, and Ottawa tribes, under the command of the famous chiefs, Little Turtle, Blue Jacket, and Joseph Brandt, aided by the renegades Simon Girty, William Wells, and Blackstaffe.
The soldiers fought bravely in this unequal contest, but were forced to retreat leaving more than nine hundred men dead and wounded on the battle field. Two hundred and fifty women accompanying the expedition were either killed or taken prisoners.
Major General Anthony Wayne, who succeeded St. Clair as Commander-In-Chief, directed the building of a stockade named Fort Recovery, December 23, 1793, on the site of St. Clair's Defeat. While in defense of the fort Major McMahon, with a detachment of troops, gained a most complete victory for the American Army over two thousand Indians and British on June 30th and July 1st 1794. Sustaining a loss of twenty-two officers and one hundred and twenty soldiers.

[North side of Monument]
Roll
Fort Recovery Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 5, 2009
3. Fort Recovery Monument Marker
View of the historical marker on the south side of the monument.
of the Dead

St. Clair's Defeat:
Major General Richard Butler; Colonel Oldham; Majors Ferguson, Hart, Clark, Lemon, Briggs, and Montgomery; Captains Bradford, Phelon, Kirkwood, Price, Van Swearingen, Tipton, Purdy, Smith, Piatt, Gaither, Crebbs, and newman; Lieutenants Spear, Warren, Boyd, McMath, Burgess, Kelso, Read, Little, Hopper, and Likens; Ensigns Cobb, Balch, Chase, Turner, Wilson, Brooks, Beatty, Purdy, and Bines; Quartermasters Reynolds, and Ward; Adjutant Anderson; Surgeons Grasson, Chase, and Beatty; also officers Ford, Morgan, Butts, McCrea, Thompson, McNickle, Crawford, Morehead, Doyle, Cummings; thirteen other officers and six hundred and thirty American soldiers.
Wayne's Victory:
Major McMahon; Captain Hartshorn; Lieutenant Craig, nineteen other officers and one hundred and twenty American soldiers.
 
Erected 1912 by U.S. Congress.
 
Location. 40° 24.794′ N, 84° 46.555′ W. Marker is in Fort Recovery, Ohio, in Mercer County. Marker is at the intersection of Butler Street (Ohio Route 119) and North Elm Street (Ohio Route 49), on the right when traveling east on Butler Street. Click for map. To view this historical marker travel into Fort Recovery, Ohio to the junction of State Routes 119 and 49 and on the northeast
Fort Recovery Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 5, 2009
4. Fort Recovery Monument Marker
View of the historical marker on the east side of the monument.
corner of the intersection is located Fort Recovery Monument Park. Once there you will see a cut stone shaft that is 93 feet tall and affixed to the sides of the base of this monument is the four plaques that make up this historical marker. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Recovery OH 45846, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dr. Victor Grasson (here, next to this marker); St. Clair's Defeat / Fort Recovery (a few steps from this marker); Fort Recovery Civil War Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Gen. Richard Butler (approx. 0.2 miles away); Wayne's Victory (approx. 0.2 miles away); St. Clair's Defeat (approx. 0.2 miles away); Battle of Fort Recovery (approx. mile away); a different marker also named St. Clair's Defeat (approx. mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Recovery.
 
Regarding Fort Recovery Monument. In 1891 the bones of the victims (an estimated 1,200 people) of the two battles that were fought at this site were taken out of Pioneer Cemetery and placed in two vaults under where this monument was to be built. The monument itself, from the foundation to the top is 101 feet and 4 inches tall, with thirty-two granite medallions on the four sides of the base,
Fort Recovery Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 5, 2009
5. Fort Recovery Monument Marker
View of the historical marker on the north side of the monument.
each bearing names of officers. On the west side of the monument a frontiersman statue was placed to signify our nations westward movement.
 
Also see . . .
1. Facts About Fort Recovery Monument Park. This web link was published and made available by Journal Publishing Company, Fort Recovery, Ohio. (Submitted on June 29, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Bone Burying Day of 1851. This web link was published and made available by Journal Publishing Company, Fort Recovery, Ohio. (Submitted on June 29, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

3. Samuel McDowell. The excerpt was taken from "The Battle on the Banks of the Wabash -- The Battle of Fort Recovery 1794" written by Fort Recovery's elementary principal Nancy Knapke (Submitted on June 29, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

4. St. Clair's Defeat. This link is published and made available by, "Ohio History Central," an online encyclopedia of Ohio History. (Submitted on June 29, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

5. Fort Recovery. This link is published and made available by, "Ohio History Central," an online encyclopedia of Ohio History. (Submitted on June 29, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

6. Ohio's Native American Wars. This web link was both published and made available by, "Touring Ohio." (Submitted on June 29, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

7. Battle of the Wabash.
Fort Recovery Monument image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 5, 2009
6. Fort Recovery Monument
(Submitted on June 29, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,360 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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