HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
            “Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
  Home  — My Markers  — Add A Marker  — Marker Series  — Links & Books  — Forum  — About Us
Clemson in Pickens County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
Military Heritage Plaza
 
Military Heritage Plaza Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
1. Military Heritage Plaza Marker
 
Inscription.
Military Heritage Plaza
"This Hallowed Ground"

Clemson University was established in 1889 to offer
education in applied sciences, including military
training. The institution opened four years later
and for the next 62 years academic life was
organized within an all-male military college
setting. This plaza depicts the passage of the cadet
through each academic year, represented by four
terraces. The military formation of footprints of
former students on the second terrace represents
the corps of cadets as it then existed. By the close
of the third year a complete Clemson man emerged
from the mold of the model cadet, rendered by
the artist in the twin towers: a man
prepared to meet life with determination to achieve
his goals, be a good citizen and make a
contribution to society. That senior cadet's likeness
appears in the sculpture on the fourth terrace.
Inscriptions on the wall caps list the major
conflicts in which Clemson men and women have
served as of 1998. Of the thousands to whom the
medals replicated here were awarded, at least three
were presented the Medal of Honor.

Clemson Military Heritage
Corps of Cadets

From the arrival of the
first 448 students in 1893
through
 
Military Heritage Plaza Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
2. Military Heritage Plaza Marker
 
the spring of
1955, Clemson was a
military college, strict
discipline and regimen
were the
essence of early
Clemson life. This Military
Heritage Plaza overlooks
the parade ground on
which all cadets became
instilled with the traits
inscribed on these steps
and from which
thousands marched away
to serve this nation in
war and peace.

Military Veterans
Since Clemson's
founding, its alumni have
served this nation in war
and peace, and many
sacrificed their lives in
battle. They epitomized
the spirit of the
citizen-soldier who takes
up arms out of a sense of
duty. The medals
displayed here replicate
the thousands awarded to
Clemson men and
women for valor, merit
and honorable service
while members of the
armed forces of the
United States.

 
Erected 1996.
 
Location. 34° 40.817′ N, 82° 50.233′ W. Marker is in Clemson, South Carolina, in Pickens County. Marker can be reached from Calhoun Drive. Click for map. Marker is on the grounds of Clemson University, north of Tillman Hall, facing Bowman Field. Marker is in this post office area: Clemson SC 29631, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are
 
Military Heritage Plaza -<br>Looking East Across Bowman Field Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
3. Military Heritage Plaza -
Looking East Across Bowman Field
 
within walking distance of this marker. Integration with Dignity, 1963 (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Green Clemson (within shouting distance of this marker); Quercus lyrata (Overcup Oak) (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Walter T. Cox, Jr. (about 400 feet away); And Then There Was War (about 500 feet away); The Old Tillman Hall Bell (about 500 feet away); Class of 1943 Veterans (about 500 feet away); First Woman Graduate (about 600 feet away); Fort Hill (about 800 feet away); Site of the First Meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Clemson Agricultural College (about 800 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Clemson.
 
Also see . . .
1. Clemson University. Official website of Clemson University. (Submitted on July 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Military Timeline. 1888: Thomas Clemson dies, leaves Fort Hill Plantation to the state to establish a college of scientific agriculture and mechanical arts. (Submitted on July 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Military Heritage Plaza. You don't have to know much about brick or design to admire Clemson's rich architecture. (Submitted on July 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Military Heritage Plaza, Clemson University. (Submitted on July 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
 
Military Heritage Plaza Towers -<br>Looking West from Bowman Field Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
4. Military Heritage Plaza Towers -
Looking West from Bowman Field
 

5. Military Heritage Plaza. Established in 1996, The Military Heritage Plaza, created from the generosity of the Classes of '50, '51, '52 and '53 honors the University's history as a military institution as well as Clemson alumni who have served the United States in times of war. (Submitted on July 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Clemson University Historic District #1. Clemson University Historic District I includes eight historic resources (four academic buildings, a recreational building, a post office, a marching and athletic field, and a park) located on the northern portion of the campus. (Submitted on July 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Bowman Field. Bowman Field is an extremely large, open grassy area in front of Sikes Hall, Tillman Hall, Godfrey Hall, Holtzendorff Hall, and Mell Hall. (Submitted on July 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. Sacred Soil of Bowman Field by James F. Barker. There is something in the soil of Bowman Field. (Submitted on July 3, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. R.T.V. Bowman. Randolph T.V. Bowman was one of Clemson's first assistant football coaches and the very first baseball coach. (Submitted on July 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
 
Military Heritage Plaza Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
5. Military Heritage Plaza
 
1. Bowman Field (1900)

Bowman Field is a predominantly flat and open grass field, approximately three acres in size. The west side slopes up toward Tillman Hill, Godfrey Hall, and Holtzendorff Hall. These buildings provide a strong visual boundary to the field. There are numerous large oak trees on the sloped southern portion of the field near Tillman Hall; the field's perimeter is marked by sidewalks. The northeast side of Bowman Field faces SC Highway 93, with the axial approach to Tillman Hall and the Clemson campus to the southeast.

Bowman field was laid out just before the 1900-01 school year; the college catalog for that year noted: "In memory of the lamented R.T.V. Bowman, late instructor in forge and foundry work, the new athletic and parade grounds have been named 'Bowman Field.'"

Bowman also coached Clemson's first baseball team, was an assistant coach with the first four football teams (1896-1899) under Walter M. Riggs (later acting president of Clemson from 1901-1911 and president from 1911-1924), and helped to establish the athletic program at Clemson before his death in 1899. Bowman Field was the site of drill, marching, and dress parades, commencement exercises and the awarding of military commissions from 1900 to the 1950s. It has also been used for meetings and other outdoor programs for the enjoyment of the college and the community,
 
"Tom and Jerry" -<br>Nearby Cannon Overlooking Bowman Field Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
6. "Tom and Jerry" -
Nearby Cannon Overlooking Bowman Field
These bronze Civil War cannons have stood watch over Bowman Field since 1951.
 
such as a 1920s band concert presented near the Y.M.C.A. Building by noted composer and bandmaster John Philip Sousa. from 1900 to 1916, when Riggs Field was dedicated, Bowman Field was also the home field for Clemson's football and baseball teams. (Source: National Register nomination form.)
    — Submitted July 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
 
Military Heritage Plaza -<br>North Tower Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
7. Military Heritage Plaza -
North Tower
 
 
Military Heritage Plaza -<br>South Tower Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
8. Military Heritage Plaza -
South Tower
 
 
Military Heritage Plaza -<br>Cadet Sculpture Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
9. Military Heritage Plaza -
Cadet Sculpture
 
 
Military Heritage Plaza -<br>Cadet Sculpture Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
10. Military Heritage Plaza -
Cadet Sculpture
 
 
Military Heritage Plaza -<br>Row of Medals Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
11. Military Heritage Plaza -
Row of Medals
From left to right: Army Distinguished Service Medal (awarded to any soldier who, while serving in any capacity with the United States Army, distinguishes himself or herself with exceptionally meritorious service to the United States in a duty of great responsibility); Navy/Marine Distinguished Service Medal (awarded to members of the Navy or Marine Corps who distinguish themselves by exceptionally meritorious service to the United States government in a duty of great responsibility); Air Force Distinguished Service Medal (awarded to any member of the United States Air Force who has distinguished himself or herself by exceptionally meritorious service to the United States Government in a duty of great responsibility); Silver Star (awarded for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States not justifying a higher award). (Description source: www.usamilitarymedals.com.)
 
 
Military Heritage Plaza -<br>Row of Medals Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
12. Military Heritage Plaza -
Row of Medals
From left to right: Defense Superior Service Medal (a senior decoration of the Department of Defense; awarded to members of the United States military who perform "superior meritorious service in a position of significant responsibility"); Legion of Merit (awarded for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements); Distinguished Flying Cross (awarded to any officer or enlisted member of the United States armed forces who distinguishes himself or herself in combat in support of operations by "heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight, subsequent to November 11, 1918."); Army Soldiers Medal - Heroism (awarded to any person of the Armed Forces of the United States or of a friendly foreign nation who, while serving in any capacity with the Army of the United States, distinguished himself or herself by heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy). (Description source: www.usamilitarymedals.com.)
 
 
Military Heritage Plaza -<br>Row of Medals Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
13. Military Heritage Plaza -
Row of Medals
From left to right: Joint Service Achievement Medal (awarded for outstanding achievement or meritorious service in a joint service command or joint service activity - not of a nature that would otherwise warrant awarding the Commendation Medal); Army Achievement Medal (awarded for outstanding achievement or meritorious service not of a nature that would otherwise warrant awarding the Commendation Medal); Navy & Marine Corps Achievement Medal (awarded for outstanding achievement or meritorious service not of a nature that would otherwise warrant awarding the Commendation Medal); Air Force Achievement Medal (awarded for outstanding achievement or meritorious service not of a nature that would otherwise warrant awarding the Commendation Medal); Prisoner of War Medal (awarded to any service member who was a prisoner of war after April 5, 1917); Air Force Combat Readiness Medal (awarded to any member of U.S. Air Force, or Air Force Reserve, who have accomplished sustained individual combat mission readiness or who have undertaken the preparedness for direct weapon-system employment); Army Good Conduct Medal (warded to any enlisted member of the United States Army who completes three consecutive years of "honorable and faithful service"); Army National Guard Components Achievement Medal (awarded for four years of honorable service in the Army National Guard with additional awards denoted by oak leaf clusters); Naval Reserve Meritorious Service Medal (awarded for outstanding performance and conduct during 4 years of enlisted service in the Naval Reserve). (Description source: www.usamilitarymedals.com.)
 
 
Military Heritage Plaza -<br>Row of Medals Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
14. Military Heritage Plaza -
Row of Medals
From left to right: Navy Expeditionary Medal (awarded to any Navy personnel who have operated in foreign territory to engage in operations, both combat and non-combat, for which no other campaign medal has been awarded); Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal (awarded to Marine Corps personnel having engaged in a landing on foreign territory, participated in combat operations against an opposing force, or participating in a designated operation for which no other service medal is authorized); American Defense Medal - WW II (authorized to any military member who performed duty between September 8, 1939 and December 6, 1941); American Campaign Medal - WW II (awarded to service members performing either one year of consecutive duty between December 7, 1941 to March 2, 1946 within the continental borders of the United States, or performing 30 days consecutive or 60 non-consecutive days of duty outside the borders of the United States but within the American Theater of Operations); Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal - WWII (awarded to any member of the United States military who served in the Pacific Theater from 1941 to 1945); European - African - Middle Eastern Campaign Medal (awarded for any service performed between December 7, 1941 and March 2, 1946 provided such service was performed in the geographical theater areas of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East. For those service members who participated in multiple battle campaigns, service stars are authorized to the decoration with the arrowhead device awarded for any airborne or amphibious operations performed); Merchant Marine World War II Victory Medal (awarded to members of the crews of ships having served 30 days or more during the period December 7, 1941 to September 3, 1945); World War II (WW II) Army of Occupation Service Medal (awarded for 30 days consecutive service while assigned to: Germany (excluding Berlin) between 9 May 1945 and 5 May 1955; Austria between 9 May 1945 and 27 July 1955; Berlin between 9 May 1945 and 2 October 1990); World War II (WW II) Navy Occupation Service Medal (awarded to Navy and Coast Guard personnel who participated in the European and Asian occupation forces following the close of the Second World War); Navy China Service Medal (awarded to U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard personnel who: 1) served ashore in China or who were attached to any of the vessels that operated in support of the operations in China between July 7, 1937, and September 7, 1939; or 2) served ashore in China or were attached to any of the vessels that operated in support of operations in China between September 2, 1945 and April 1, 1957); National Defense Service Medal (awarded to anyone who serves on active duty in the United States military during a designated time period). (Description source: www.usamilitarymedals.com.)
 
 
Military Heritage Plaza -<br>Row of Medals Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
15. Military Heritage Plaza -
Row of Medals
From left to right: Korean Service Medal (awarded to any U.S. service member, performing duty in the Republic of Korea, between June 27, 1950 and June 27, 1954); Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (awarded for participation in "any military campaign of the United States for which no other service medal is authorized" including the Cuban Missile Crisis between October 1962 and June 1963, actions in Lebanon, Taiwan, the Congo, Quemoy and Matsu, and for duty in Berlin between 1961 and 1963, initial operations in South Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, Panama, Grenada, Libya, Operation Earnest Will, peacekeeping and sanction missions against Iraq, Operation Northern Watch, Operation Southern Watch, Operation Vigilant Sentinel, and United Nations actions, including Bosnia and Somalia); Vietnam Service Medal (awarded to any service member who served more than thirty consecutive days, or 60 non-consecutive days, in the Republic of Vietnam between the dates of 1961-11-15 and 1973-03-28, and from 29 April 1975 to 30 April 1975); Southwest Asia Service Medal (awarded for military service between August 2, 1990 and November 30, 1995 for participation during Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm); Armed Forces Reserve Medal (awarded to service members completing a total of ten years service as a member of a Reserve or National Guard component of the United States military); Navy Reserve Medal (first issued on September 12, 1938 and was an active decoration until 1958; awarded to a service member who performed ten years of continuous service in either an active duty, drilling reservist, or inactive status); United Nations (UN) Korean Service Medal (an international military decoration established by the United Nations on December 12, 1950; awarded to any military service member, of an Armed Force allied with South Korea, who participated in the defense of Korea from North Korean aggression between the dates of June 27, 1950 and July 27, 1954); French Croix De Guerre Medal - WWII (in the United States military, the Croix de guerre was commonly accepted as a foreign decoration; two version); Philippine Defense Medal - World War II (awarded to any service member, of either the Philippine military or an allied armed force, which participated in the defense of the Philippine Islands between December 8, 1941 and June 15, 1942); Philippine Liberation Medal - World War II (awarded to any service member, of both Philippine and allied militaries, who participated in the liberation of the Philippine Islands between the dates of October 17, 1944 and September 2, 1945); Republic of Vietnam (RVN) Gallantry Cross Medal w/Palm (a military decoration of South Vietnam established in August 1950; awarded to any U.S. military personnel who have accomplished deeds of valor or displayed heroic conduct while fighting an enemy force); Republic of Vietnam (RVN) Campaign Medal (a military award of South Vietnam established in 1966; awarded to any member of the United States military who completed at least six months of duty in the Republic of Vietnam between the dates of March 1, 1961 and March 28, 1973); Saudi Arabian Medal for the Liberation of Kuwait (awarded to members of the Coalition Forces who participated in Operation Desert Storm and the liberation of Kuwait between the dates of January 17, 1991 and February 28, 1991). (Description source: www.usamilitarymedals.com.)
 
 
Military Heritage Plaza -<br>Row of Medals Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
16. Military Heritage Plaza -
Row of Medals
From left to right: Korea Defense Service Medal (authorized for those members of the U.S. military who have served duty in the Republic of Korea to uphold the armistice between South and North Korea); Armed Forces Service Medal (presented to those service members who engage in "significant activity" for which no other campaign or service medal is authorized); Kosovo Campaign Medal (awarded to service members assigned to a military unit for thirty days, or sixty cumulative days, in support of one of the following operations: Operation Allied Force: March 24, 1999 through June 10, 1999; Operation Allied Harbor: April 4, 1999 through September 1, 1999;Operation Shining Hope: April 4, 1999 through July 10, 1999; Operation Noble Anvil: March 24, 1999 through July 20, 1999; Operation Joint Guardian: June 11, 1999 to a date to be determined); Global War on Terrorism Service Medal (authorized for service members participating in or serving in support of Global War on Terrorism operations on or after Sept.11, 2001, and to a future date to be determined); Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal (authorized for service members deployed overseas for service in the Global War on Terrorism operations on or after September 11, 2001, and to a future date to be determined); Afghanistan Campaign Medal (awarded to any member of the U.S. military who has performed duty within the borders of Afghanistan (or its airspace) for a period of thirty consecutive days or sixty non-consecutive days); Iraq Campaign Medal (awarded to any member of the U.S. military who has performed duty within the borders of Iraq (or its territorial waters) for a period of thirty consecutive days or sixty non-consecutive days). (Description source: www.usamilitarymedals.com.)
 
 
Military Heritage Plaza -<br>Row of Medals Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
17. Military Heritage Plaza -
Row of Medals
From left to right: Army Distinguished Service Cross Meda; (a U.S. Army decoration awarded for extreme gallantry and risk of life in actual combat with an armed enemy force); Navy Cross Medal (the second highest medal that can be awarded by the United States Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard); Congressional Medal of Honor (highest military honor awarded by the U.S. Congress); Air Force Cross Medal (the second highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Air Force); Department of Defense Distinguished Service Medal (presented for exceptionally distinguished performance of duty contributing to national security or defense of the United States). (Description source: www.usamiliraymedals.com.)
 
 
Military Heritage Plaza Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott
18. Military Heritage Plaza Marker
Medals from left to right: Joint Service Commendation Medal (awarded for heroism or meritorious service while assigned to a joint command or joint activity); Army Commendation Medal (a mid-level award presented for sustained acts of heroism or meritorious service); Air Force Commendation Medal (a mid-level award presented for sustained acts of heroism or meritorious service). (Description source: www.usamilitarymedals.com.)

Dedicated to Clemson Military Heritage 1893-1955
Major Donors
Ashmore Bros Inc
Class of '41, R Roy Pearce, President
Class of '42, Thomas C Breazeale, President
Class of '58, Clyde W Mulkey, President
Milton W Holcombe and Family '53
Senior Platoon Alumni

Landscape Architect
Seamon Whiteside and Associates

Sculpture
TJ Dixon
James Nelson

Construction
Clemson University

Alumni Who Guided the Effort to Erect This Tribute to Clemson History
Russell C Ashmore Jr '50
N James Covington '51
Daniel M Carmichael Jr, Class President '53
William W Coogler Jr '53
James E Cushman '51
LeRoy H Doar Jr, Class President '52
F Earle Gaulden Jr '51
Samuel J Grant Jr '52
Bobby L Hughuley '52
William C Laffoday, Project Chairman, Class President '51
John E Lunn '52
Thomas C Mann '51
W Richard Mattox '51
John H Pitts III '51
Ann Batson Smith '82
Thomas P Turner Jr '51
Samuel M Willis, Class President '50
Hughey A Woodle Jr, Fund Campaign Chairman '51
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on July 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,691 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on July 3, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18. submitted on July 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
 
Recommend or Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr


•••
More Search Options
 
Markers
Near You

 
Categories

 
States & Provinces

 
Counties
Click to List


 
Countries

Page composed
in 220 ms.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To search within this page, hold down the Ctrl key and press F.
On an Apple computer,
hold down the Apple key and press F.