Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Highland in Sullivan County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Hospital Rock

Revolutionary War Heritage Trail

 
 
Hospital Rock Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 3, 2009
1. Hospital Rock Marker
Inscription. Hospital Rock is the most historically significant place on the battleground. Once Brantís men broke the Americansí defensive square late in the afternoon, it was in the shadow of this rock that Lt. Col. Benjamin Tusten, a physician from Goshen, and seventeen wounded militiamen under his care, were trapped and killed by Brantís Iroquois Native Americans and Tories. After the battle, Brant recrossed the Delaware River and proceeded to Oquaga. The militiamen who escaped the fate of Tusten made their way back to their homes.

Colonel Hathorn wrote of the end:
“The enemy who formed their whole strength and forced the North East part of our Lines . . . our people, not being able to support the lines retreating down the hill precipitously towards the river . . . The people this time were so scattered I found myself unequal to Rally them again, consequently every Man made a Choice of his own Way.”

Joseph Brant reported that he:
“ . . . pursued them, until they stopt upon a Rocky Hill, round which we were employed and very busy, near four hours before we couíd drive them out. We have taken 40 odd scalps, and one Prisoner, a Captain. I suppose the Enemy have lost nearly half of their men and most of their Officers; they all belonged to the Militia & were about 150 in number.”
Marker at Hospital Rock image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 3, 2009
2. Marker at Hospital Rock

 
Erected by New York State.
 
Location. 41° 29.34′ N, 74° 58.212′ W. Marker is in Highland, New York, in Sullivan County. Marker can be reached from Minisink Battle Ground Road, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is located in Minisink Battleground Park, along the Battleground Trail. Marker is in this post office area: Barryville NY 12719, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Minisink Battle Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); In Memory of Our Fallen Heroes (within shouting distance of this marker); Last Stand On The Rocky Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); Indian Rock (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Battle at Minisink (about 700 feet away); Minisink Battleground Park (about 700 feet away); Minisink Battle July 22d 1779 (approx. 0.6 miles away); Brantís Crossing (approx. 0.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Highland.
 
More about this marker. Two pictures appear on the marker. One depicts Lt. Col. Benjamin Tusten tending to a wounded militiaman, and the other shows the Americans fending off Brantís attacking men.
 
Related markers. Click here for a
Marker in Minisink Battleground Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 3, 2009
3. Marker in Minisink Battleground Park
list of markers that are related to this marker. Follow the markers along the Battleground Trail in Minisink Battleground Park.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle at Minisink Ford. Minisink Valley Historical Society website. (Submitted on July 4, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. The Battle of Minisink. The American Revolutionary War website. (Submitted on July 4, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansWar, US Revolutionary
 
Marker on the Battleground Trail image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 3, 2009
4. Marker on the Battleground Trail
Hospital Rock image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 3, 2009
5. Hospital Rock
Wreaths can be seen in this photo, placed at the spot where Lt. Col. Tusten and many militiamen lost their lives.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 894 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement