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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Parris Island in Beaufort County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Uncommon Valor

 
 
Uncommon Valor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 26, 2009
1. Uncommon Valor Marker
Inscription.
"Uncommon Valor Was A Common Virtue"
Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima
20 February 1945

1  PFC Ira Hayes,USMCR
Sacaton, Arizona
MCRD, San Diago Aug 42

2  PFC Franklin R. Sousley,USMCR
Flemingsburg KY
21 Mar 45 (KIA)
MCRD, San Diago Jan 44

3  Sgt. Michael Strank, USMC
Conemaugh, Pa.
1 Mar 45 (KIA)
MCRD, Parris Island Oct 39

4  PHM2/C (corpsman) John H Bradley, USN
Antigo, Wisconsin
Recruit Training Farragut Idaho Jan 43

5  PFC Rene Gagnon, USMCR
Manchester NH
MCRD, Parris Island Mar 43

6  CPL Harlon H Block, USMC
Yorktown TX 1 Mar 45 (KIA)
MCRD, San Diago Feb 43

 
Location. 32° 21.032′ N, 80° 40.923′ W. Marker is in Parris Island, South Carolina, in Beaufort County. Marker is on Blvd. deFrance, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Between Midway and Vera Cruz Streets. Marker is in this post office area: Parris Island SC 29905, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Peatross Parade Deck (within shouting distance of this marker); To Purple Heart Recipients (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line);
Uncommon Valor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 26, 2009
2. Uncommon Valor Marker
( Laurel Wreath Emblem )
Uncommon Valor
Was A
Common Virtue

Semper Fidelis
Japanese 75mm Field Gun (approx. 0.3 miles away); Barrow Hall (approx. half a mile away); Emancipation Day • Camp Saxton Site (approx. 2.7 miles away); Northern Most Known Bastion of Spanish Florida (approx. 3.1 miles away); Charlesfort-Santa Elena Site (approx. 3.1 miles away); Fort San Marcos & The Ribaut Monument (approx. 3.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Parris Island.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. Memorial at Arlington, Va
 
Also see . . .
1. Marine Corps War Memorial (Arlington, VA). Five Marines and a Navy corpsman mounted the new flag on a piece of pipe. Together they raised this flag atop the former Japanese bastion. The six flag-raisers represented a cross-section of America:
- PFC Ira Hayes, a full-blooded Pima Indian from Arizona.
- Sgt. Michael Strank, a Pennsylvania coal mine worker.
- Cpl. Harlon Block, a draftee from the Texas oil fields.
- PFC Franklin Sousley, a 19 year old Kentucky farm boy.
- PFC Rene Gagnon, a New Englander rejected by the Navy.
- PM2 (corpsman) John Bradley, a funeral director's
Uncommon Valor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Henry, June 26, 2009
3. Uncommon Valor Marker
In Honor and In memory of
the men of the
United States Marine Corps
who have given
their lives to their country
since 10 November 1775
apprentice. (Submitted on July 10, 2009.) 

2. Flag Raising at Mt. Suribachi, (sculpture), SIRIS entry. Inventory of American Sculpture 64470001 (Submitted on July 11, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. "...stopping time for 1/400th of a second..."
Joe Rosenthal, of the Associated Press, photographed the men as they raised the flag. That picture, stopping time for 1/400th of a second, would become the most famous photograph of all time.

After 36 terrible days, Iwo Jima finally fell to the Marines. Of the forty men in 3rd Platoon who stormed the beach, only four escaped from being killed or seriously wounded on Iwo Jima. Of the six men who raised the flag, Cpl. Block, Sgt. Strank, and PFC Sousley were killed-in-action within days. They are among the 6,821 Americans who never left Iwo Jima alive. Further, an additional 19,217 Americans were maimed or grievously wounded. In July 1947 the U.S. Congress authorized a Marine Corps War Memorial, based on the timeless photograph by Joe Rosenthal. The new memorial was sculpted by Felix de Weldon. In 108 separate pieces, it was cast in a New York foundry and then trucked to Washington. Ground-breaking and assembly began on 19 February 1954, the ninth anniversary
Uncommon Valor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, February 18, 2011
4. Uncommon Valor Marker
of the Iwo Jima landing. The final cost of $850,000 was borne entirely by donations, 96 percent of them from U.S. Marines.

Burnished into the base of polished black Swedish granite, in gold letters, is the inscription, "Uncommon Valor Was A Common Virtue."
excerpt from Warrior Culture of the U.S. Marines, copyright 2001. Marion F. Sturkey, made available by the Heritage Press International (see links).
    — Submitted July 9, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

2. The heroic flag raising on Mount Surabach, Iwo Jima, in 1945
An inspiration to all Americans as a symbol of freedom, the monument personifies several of the many qualities Marines instill in recruits: confidence, discipline, fidelity and the rugged determination to overcome insurmountable odds.

This version, constructed of coated plaster, was made by Felix de Weldon and predates his more famous bronze version near Arlington Cemetery, Washington D.C. This piece was used to raise money for the much larger bronze monument that was eventually erected in our nation’s capital.
It replicates perhaps the most famous photograph of all time, that taken by Combat Photographer Joe Rosenthal.

Source: Parris Island Driving Tour Pamphlet of December 3, 2008.
Stopping Time For 1/400th Of A Second, Would Become The <b> Most Famous Photograph Of All Time. </b> image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 26, 2009
5. Stopping Time For 1/400th Of A Second, Would Become The Most Famous Photograph Of All Time.
    — Submitted July 10, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

3. Article from The Boot
Inventory of American Sculpture files also contain copy of newspaper article from The Boot (Parris Island, SC), Sept. 12, 1952, which discusses the dedication; and an excerpt of unpublished archival material which discusses deterioration and vandalism circa 1956, and preservation efforts in 1961 and 1964.
    — Submitted July 11, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

 
Categories. 20th CenturyMilitaryNotable EventsNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismWar, World II
 
Iwo Jima Monument, Parris Island US Marine Corps Recruit Depot image. Click for full size.
By Paul Henry, June 26, 2009
6. Iwo Jima Monument, Parris Island US Marine Corps Recruit Depot
Commemorating the heroic flag raising on Mount Surabach, Iwo Jima, in 1945
Washington DC Bronze Monument ( Arlington , Virginia ) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, circa 1985
7. Washington DC Bronze Monument ( Arlington , Virginia )
Marine Memorial, famous bronze version near Arlington Cemetery. image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, circa 1985
8. Marine Memorial, famous bronze version near Arlington Cemetery.
Map of Parris Island image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 22, 2011
9. Map of Parris Island
The Iwo Jima Monument (this monument) #18 on map
Uncommon Valor Stained Glass Window image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, April 22, 2011
10. Uncommon Valor Stained Glass Window
Located across the road, in the Recruit Chapel
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,107 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   9, 10. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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