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Genoa in Douglas County, Nevada — The American Mountains (Southwest)
Mormon Station
No. 132

— Erected June 1949 —
 
Mormon Station Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, July 6, 2009
1. Mormon Station Marker
 
Inscription. In 1851 Col. John Reese, with a little band of eighteen men crossed the great deserts and built the first trading post in Nevada, “Mormon Station”. Later came more members of the Mormon Faith who settled and established the town of Genoa. Among these came the first lady settler, Eliza Ann Middaugh Mott, wife of Israel Mott. The first native daughter was Louisa Beatrice Mott.
Under the leadership of Orson Hyde, the community prospered and the area became Carson County, Utah.
Washoe County, Nevada.

 
Erected 1949 by Native Daughters of Utah Pioneers. (Marker Number 132.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of Utah Pioneers marker series.
 
Location. 39° 0.248′ N, 119° 50.746′ W. Marker is in Genoa, Nevada, in Douglas County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Jacks Valley Road/Main Street (Nevada Route 206) and Genoa Lane. Click for map. Marker is located at the Mormon Station Historic State Monument. Marker is in this post office area: Genoa NV 89411, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mormon Station - Genoa (here, next to this marker); John A. “Snowshoe” Thompson (within shouting distance of this marker); Genoa (within shouting distance of this marker); Nevada’s First Newspaper (within shouting distance of this marker); Genoa or “Mormon Station” of the Pony Express (within shouting distance of this marker); The Pony Express (about 300 feet away, in a direct line); a different marker also named John A. “Snowshoe” Thompson (about 300 feet away); Douglas Lodge #12, F& AM (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Genoa.
 
Mormon Station Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, July 6, 2009
2. Mormon Station Marker
This marker is located on the left. A second Mormon Station marker is on the right.
 

 
Regarding Mormon Station. See "Nearby Marker" Mormon Station - Genoa for additional information and photos.
 
Also see . . .
1. Mormon Station State Park. Official Site of the Nevada States Parks (Submitted on July 10, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.) 

2. Mormon Station State Park Brochure. (Submitted on July 10, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.)
3. Town of Genoa. Information on Mormon Station (Submitted on July 10, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.) 

4. The History of Genoa. "The first permanent settlement was established in the spring of 1851 by Colonel John Reese, a Mormon, who planned to open a trading post on the overland trail. He was a partner with his brother Enoch in the J. & E. Reese Mercantile firm at Salt Lake City. The party arrived in Carson Valley with 13 wagons loaded with eggs, bacon, flour, seed grain and other kinds of seeds. Stephen A. Kinsey, Reese's nephew, acted as guide. Kinsey stopped for a time at a place on the Carson River called Ragtown. This point did not seem favorable so he moved up the river into one of the most fertile of valleys." (Submitted on July 10, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Informational Kiosk on the Grounds of the Mormon Station State Park
 
Mormon Station Trading Post Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, July 6, 2009
3. Mormon Station Trading Post
This replica of the trading post building now houses the Park Museum.
 

Information regarding the Park, the Pony Express, the controversy surrounding Genoa or Dayton being the first settlement in Nevada, additional Nevada State Parks information, the California Trail, and Pioneer Life information.


Pioneer Life:
During the 1800’s, many pioneer women, as protector’s of their family’s health, turned to folk wisdom and home remedies. Even when doctors were available, they were no more knowledgeable than the patients themselves. Patented medicines were no more reliable than the quack who sold them.

Baldness: Smear your head with fresh cow manure.

Cuts: Pack the cut with axel grease.

Coughs: Put some cow dung in water and bring to boil. Gargle the water three times a day.

Crick in the neck: Go down to the hog pen and find where a hog has rubbed against the fence, then rub your neck in the same spot and your crick will be gone.

California Trail:
Mormon Station: Mormon Station served as a supply station to the emigrants. Food, supplies, and fresh animals could be obtained here from John Reese for a price. The plentitude of land and water enabled Reese to build a store and a hotel on this spot. He was able to grow a small yet profitable garden and graze animals for resale.
The Carson Route:
Although steeper than Donner Pass, the
 
Within the Walls of the Fortress Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, July 6, 2009
4. Within the Walls of the Fortress
 
Carson River Route section of the California Trail became a major thoroughfare to California. Travelers had no need to disassemble the wagons to climb over the mountains or fear another winter catastrophe.
Carson Valley: Emigrants followed the foothills while in the Carson Valley to avoid the bogs and marshes. But the wagon trains would leave the trail to graze their animals in the grasses nearby.
Supplies: Once resupplied, the emigrants would continue along the foothills following what is today HWY 88 over Carson Pass into California.
Reese knew he could charge almost any price for his supplies due to the location and need. One pound of sugar or flour cost $2.00. A pound of bacon sold for $2.00
Compare the prices in 1851 to today’s prices….1 lb of bacon - $2.29, 5 lbs of sugar - $.99 and 5 lbs of flour - $.79.
    — Submitted July 10, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.
 
Informational Kiosk Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, July 6, 2009
5. Informational Kiosk
Pioneer Life
 
 
Informational Kiosk Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, July 6, 2009
6. Informational Kiosk
The Pony Express
 
 
Informational Kiosk Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, July 6, 2009
7. Informational Kiosk
Pony Express
See Nearby Marker Genoa or “Mormon Station” of the Pony Express for additional information.
 
 
California Trail - National Historical Trail Marker CR-23 (2003) Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, July 6, 2009
8. California Trail - National Historical Trail Marker CR-23 (2003)
Carson Trail - Original Mormon Station
"At the...foot of the mountains, the Mormons...have
established a trading post....passing on from this place, as fast as we could....to save what little money we had. We continued up Carson Valley"
Edward Patterson, July 11, 1850
 
 
National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark Marker CR32 (2003) Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, July 6, 2009
9. National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark Marker CR32 (2003)
 
 
Mormon Station State Park Sign Photo, Click for full size
By Syd Whittle, July 6, 2009
10. Mormon Station State Park Sign
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on July 10, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 1,385 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on July 10, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.
 
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