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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Towson in Baltimore County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Hampton

 
 
Hampton 1783-1790 Baltimore County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, 08-12-2007
1. Hampton 1783-1790 Baltimore County Marker
Inscription. 1783–1790, Baltimore County. Estate of the Ridgely Family from 1745 to 1948. Home of Charles Carnan Ridgely, Govenor of Maryland, 1815–1819. One of the largest Georgian Houses in the United States. Now a National Historic Site. Open to the public.
 
Erected 1968 by Maryland Historical Society.
 
Location. 39° 25.063′ N, 76° 35.477′ W. Marker is in Towson, Maryland, in Baltimore County. Marker is on Hampton Lane half a mile east of Dulaney Valley Road, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Towson MD 21286, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Wartime Support (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hampton: An American Story (approx. 0.2 miles away); Captain Charles Ridgely (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ice Cream in July-Icehouse, ca.1790 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ridgely's Pride (approx. 0.2 miles away); Oranges in January (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Romance with Nature: The Falling Garden (approx. 0.2 miles away); In Memoriam (approx. mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Towson.
 
More about this marker. This marker replaced one erected by the Maryland
Front view of Hampton Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 12, 2007
2. Front view of Hampton Mansion
State Roads Commission in 1934.
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable BuildingsNotable PersonsPolitics
 
Orangery image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, 08-12-2007
3. Orangery
Orangery Interpretive Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 12, 2007
4. Orangery Interpretive Marker
Orangery circa 1825, reconstructed 1976. Originally a fine, Greek Revival stuccoed building, with floor-to-ceiling triple sash windows on the south and east sides, the Orangery was destroyed by fire in 1928. The greenhouse-like structure was used to grow citrus trees—orange lemon, and lime—and tropical plants such as pineapples. Grape vines were espaliered on interior walls. Sunlight, and a woodburning hypocaust stove, supplied heat under the floor. The trees, in large boxes, were taken outside in the summer. The function of this building and its north exterior have been modified during reconstruction.
Hampton Ice House image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, 08-12-2007
5. Hampton Ice House
Ice House Interpretive Marker image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, August 12, 2007
6. Ice House Interpretive Marker
Ice House circa 1800. A subterranean structure with central circular chamber, 33' 7" deep, boasting a brick dome with fieldstone side walls. The room is approached by an underground vaulted passageway on the south side, and insulated with several feet of earth. The structure was used to store ice cut in the winter from near-by ponds. Ice was used to preserve food, make ice cream, and cool drinks for the Ridgely family.
Map of Hampton Mansion grounds. image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, 08-12-2007
7. Map of Hampton Mansion grounds.
Hampton Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, 08-12-2007
8. Hampton Mansion
National Park Service is renovating the building in 2007.
Formal Gardens at Hampton Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Beverly Pfingsten, 08-12-2007
9. Formal Gardens at Hampton Mansion
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,033 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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