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Parris Island in Beaufort County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Northern Most Known Bastion of Spanish Florida

 
 
Northern Most Known Bastion of Spanish Florida Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 26, 2009
1. Northern Most Known Bastion of Spanish Florida Marker
Inscription. Less than three decades after Columbus had discovered America, on Aug. 18, 1521 ( St. Helena's Day ), Spanish seafarers from Santo Domingo sighted this magnificent harbor, named its Eastern headland the Punta de Santa Elena, from which the area derived its name, and claimed it for the King of Spain. For nearly half a century this was the mecca of Spain's repeatedly frustrated efforts to plant a settlement on the Atlantic Coast, Not however until after Ribaut's garrison had abandoned Charlesfort, at what he had called Port Royal, did Menéndez de Avilés arrive to prevent further incursions by the French, to assert Spanish sovereignty, and to Christianize the natives. Dispatched by Phillip II of Spain in 1565 with a fleet of vessels and over 2500 colonists, he had made his landfall at Cape Canaveral, expelled the French from Fort Caroline on the River May, established and fortified St. Augustine, and wreaked vengeance on the returning Rebaut. In the summer of 1567 he proceeded to Santa Elena, apparently his original destination; here he planted Fort San Felipe, the northernmost known bastion of the province of Florida and built the city planned for its development.

For twenty years Spain's tenure was marked by varying degrees of success, marred by disintegrating relations with the Indians, who destroyed the Fort and the settlement
Northern Most Known Bastion of Spanish Florida Marker image. Click for full size.
By Northern Most Known Bastion Marker, June 26, 2009
2. Northern Most Known Bastion of Spanish Florida Marker
in 1577. The fortress was promptly replaced by Fort San Marcos, its palisades made of cedar logs brought from St. Augustine; but the settlement remained in ashes until 1580 when it was rebuilt to its former condition - - some sixty odd buildings, half of which were tabby. Partially governed by its inhabitants, it furnished what was possibly the first instance of the use of the democratic process, and of woman suffrage in the New World.

Both the Fort and the settlement were abandoned in 1587 when the inhabitants were withdrawn to St. Augustine to strengthen its defenses following Sir Francis Drake's raid of the previous year.
 
Erected by Beaufort County Historical Society.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina, Beaufort County Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 32° 18.381′ N, 80° 40.538′ W. Marker is in Parris Island, South Carolina, in Beaufort County. Marker is on Balleau Wood Road. Click for map. Located on the north hiking trail from Balleau Wood Road Circle. Marker is in this post office area: Parris Island SC 29905, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Charlesfort-Santa Elena Site (a few steps from this marker); Fort San Marcos & The Ribaut Monument
Northern Most Known Bastion of Spanish Florida Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 26, 2009
3. Northern Most Known Bastion of Spanish Florida Marker
(a few steps from this marker); Fort San Marcos (a few steps from this marker); Jean Ribault Monument (a few steps from this marker); The First Inhabitants (within shouting distance of this marker); Aqui Estuvo España (within shouting distance of this marker); Parris Island Indians (within shouting distance of this marker); Parris Island Plantations (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Parris Island.
 
Categories. ExplorationForts, CastlesSettlements & Settlers
 
Northern Most Known Bastion of Spanish Florida Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 26, 2008
4. Northern Most Known Bastion of Spanish Florida Marker
seen at north hiking trail, from Balleau Wood Rd. Circle
Marked area of known Fort Marcos image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 26, 2008
5. Marked area of known Fort Marcos
partial outline of Fort Marcos marked by pylons image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 26, 2009
6. partial outline of Fort Marcos marked by pylons
French Memorial at left
San Marcos image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 26, 2009
7. San Marcos
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 855 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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