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Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
Albert Gallatin
 
Albert Gallatin Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
1. Albert Gallatin Marker
 
Inscription.
Secretary of the Treasury
Genius of Finance
Senator and Representative
Commissioner for the Treaty of Ghent
Minister to France and Great Britain
And Steadfast
Champion of Democracy
1761–1849

 
Location. 38° 53.905′ N, 77° 2.058′ W. Marker is in Downtown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Pennsylvannia Avenue and 15th Street, on the right when traveling east on Pennsylvannia Avenue. Click for map. In the Treasury Department courtyard. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1500 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington DC 20004, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. United States Department of the Treasury (a few steps from this marker); Webster-Ashburton Treaty (within shouting distance of this marker); The Inaugural Parade Tradition (within shouting distance of this marker); The White House (within shouting distance of this marker); Melvin Jones (within shouting distance of this marker); Ballington and Maud Booth (within shouting distance of this marker); Freedmanís Savings And Trust (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); William Edwin Hall 1876 - 1961 (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Downtown.
 
More about this marker.
 
Albert Gallatin Photo, Click for full size
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2015
2. Albert Gallatin
 
“The memorial was authorized by Congress on January 11, 1927 and responsibility for the installation of the memorial was placed with the Albert Gallatin Memorial Fund Commission. By 1934 enough funds had been raised, but the memorial was delayed by the U.S. Fine Arts Commissionís approval of a suitable model. By the time the model was ready to be cast, World War II had created a ban on the non-war use of bronze. Before installation in the north courtyard of the Treasury, a fountain had to be removed. Finally the sculpture was installed and dedicated on October 15, 1947.” —Smithonian Institution Research Information System.
 
Regarding Albert Gallatin. The Treaty of Ghent was the “Treaty of Peace and Amity between His Britannic Majesty and the United States of America” which concluded the War of 1812.

Albert Gallatin is also known as the Father of the National Road, “the road that built the nation.” He advised George Washington on possible routes and later, while Thomas Jeffersonís Treasury Secretary, he formulated the plan to fund the project. Started in 1811, it became the first federally funded highway. The National Road ran from Maryland through Pennsylvania to Wheeling, West Virginia, and then through Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. There are a great number of markers on the National Road in this database.
 
Albert Gallatin Memorial Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
3. Albert Gallatin Memorial
Bronze sculpture, painted black, by James Earle Fraser (1876–1953) is 8 feet high on a 4 foot high granite base.
 

 
Also see . . .
1. Albert Gallatin. (Submitted on August 19, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. The Treaty of Ghent. (Submitted on August 19, 2007.)
3. Road through the Wilderness: The Making of the National Road. Article by Timothy Crumrin describes how Gallatin invented the first method of constitutionally funding state projects with federal money. (Submitted on August 19, 2007.) 
 
Albert Gallatin Memorial at the Treasury Dept. Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
4. Albert Gallatin Memorial at the Treasury Dept.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on August 19, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,435 times since then. This page was the Marker of the Week September 2, 2012. Photos:   1. submitted on August 19, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on January 1, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3, 4. submitted on August 19, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
 
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