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Near Shiloh in Hardin County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Battery H, 1st Illinois Light Artillery

Unassigned

 

—Army of the Tennessee —

 
Battery H, 1st Illinois Light Artillery Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
1. Battery H, 1st Illinois Light Artillery Monument
Inscription. (Front of Monument):
Illinois
Battery "H",
1st Regiment Lt. Artillery,
Unassigned,
Army of the Tennessee

(Plaque on Back):
Silfversparre's Battery, "H".
Commanded by
Capt. Axel Silfverparre.
This battery consisting of four 20 pounders, arrived at the Landing April 5, 1862. During Sunday the guns were brought by hand to this position and did good service in resisting the afternoon attack upon this line. The battery had 6 men missing.
 
Erected by State of Illinois.
 
Location. 35° 9.025′ N, 88° 19.305′ W. Marker is near Shiloh, Tennessee, in Hardin County. Marker is on Pittsburg Landing Road, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Located between the visitor center parking lot and the National Cemetery at Shiloh National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Shiloh TN 38376, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 55th Illinois Infantry (here, next to this marker); 54th Ohio Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); Shiloh National Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Powell's Battery
Plaque on Back of Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
2. Plaque on Back of Monument
(within shouting distance of this marker); Camp of Powell's Battery (within shouting distance of this marker); Headquarters General U. S. Grant (within shouting distance of this marker); Army of the Ohio (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Army of the Mississippi (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Shiloh.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Monument and a Mix of Four Guns image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
3. Monument and a Mix of Four Guns
The monument stands to the side of the 55th Illinois Infantry tablet (right). Four artillery pieces represent the battery, but none are 20-pdr Parrott Rifles. The park uses this position to display a sampling of artillery types used at Shiloh. The four pieces include a James Rifle, 6-pdr Field Gun, a 10-pdr Parrott Rifle, and a Wiard Rifle.
Muzzle of a James Rifle image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
4. Muzzle of a James Rifle
This 3.80-inch James Rifle, "Type 2, Series 4" is a late production example of the type. Cast in 1862 by Ames Manufacturing in Massachusetts, clearly indicated as "1862" and "A.M. Co." to the right side. The registry number 74 is at the top left. The weight is indicated as 914 pounds on the lower left. At the bottom the initials G.T.B. indicate the inspector, George T. Balch.
6pdr Field Gun Model 1961 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
5. 6pdr Field Gun Model 1961
From a distance, this weapon has a similar shape to that of the James Rifle. But it is smoothbore. With a registry number "5" on the muzzle, this weapon was produced in 1861. It was, like the rifle, cast by Ames Manufacturing and inspected by George T. Balch. However it weighed 859 pounds.
10-pdr (2.9 inch) Parrott Rifle image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
6. 10-pdr (2.9 inch) Parrott Rifle
The only 10-pdr Federal Parrott Rifle on display in the park. This piece was produced in 1862 by West Point Foundry, New York. It bears registry number 238 on the muzzle.
12-pdr (3.67-inch) Wiard Rifle image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
7. 12-pdr (3.67-inch) Wiard Rifle
One of the rare pieces within the park's collection. The Wiard was designed by Canadian-American Norman Wiard. The guns were likely produced by O'Donnell Foundry in New York, using steel casting. Seen here on a standard reproduction carriage, the original guns had an advanced carriage that allowed the gun to elevate higher than normal field guns. The carriage also featured system of chains and shoes for each wheel to aid ascent and descent in broken terrain.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 894 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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