Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Louisville in Jefferson County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Zachary Taylor National Cemetery

 
 
Zachary Taylor National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 26, 2003
1. Zachary Taylor National Cemetery Marker
Inscription. Gen. Zachary Taylor (1784 – 1850), distinguished lifelong soldier and twelfth President of the United States, buried here in family cemetery. Commissioned Lt. in 1808. Served in War of 1812; Black Hawk War, 1832; Seminole War, 1836 – 43. Major Gen., 1846. Western Army Command, 1847. Elected President 1848. Died in office.
 
Erected by Commonwealth of Kentucky. (Marker Number 1412.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Kentucky Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 38° 16.584′ N, 85° 38.497′ W. Marker is in Louisville, Kentucky, in Jefferson County. Marker is on Brownsboro Road (U.S. 42), on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4701 Brownsboro Road, Louisville KY 40207, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Zachary Taylor Home (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Zachary Taylor Home (approx. 0.4 miles away); George Rogers Clark At Locust Grove / Lewis and Clark in Kentucky - Locust Grove (approx. 1.4 miles away); Water Works Pumping Station (approx.
Zachary Taylor National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 26, 2003
2. Zachary Taylor National Cemetery Marker
The marker is located next to the entrance to the National Cemetery.
3.3 miles away); Civil War Hospital (approx. 4.3 miles away in Indiana); Enid Yandell (1869-1934) / Renowned Woman Sculptor (approx. 4.4 miles away); George Rogers Clark (approx. 4.7 miles away); The 32nd Indiana Volunteer Infantry Regiment Civil War Monument (approx. 4.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Louisville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Biography of Zachary Taylor. Official White House website. (Submitted on August 5, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Official Web Site - - U. S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs. Has an excellent History of the "Zachary Taylor National Cemetery" and other items. (Submitted on August 8, 2009, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNotable Persons
 
Tomb of Zachary Taylor image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 26, 2003
3. Tomb of Zachary Taylor
President Taylor and his wife were interred in this mausoleum on May 6, 1926. Before that, their remains were in the Taylor family vault seen in the photo in the background to the left.
Zachary Taylor Monument image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 26, 2003
4. Zachary Taylor Monument
This monument to Zachary Taylor, located near the Taylor mausoleum, is inscribed with the names of battles in which he took part, including Palo Alto, Resacca, De La Palma, Monterey and Beuna Vista (Buena Vista).
Zachary Taylor image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
5. Zachary Taylor
This 1848 portrait of Zachary Taylor by James Reid Lambdin hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“Throughout his career as a professional soldier Zachary Taylor took no more than a passing, interest in politics. But his victories at the battles of Palo Alto, Monterrey, and Buena Vista during the Mexican War changed all of that. In their wake, this ‘rough and ready’ general became eminently ripe for elective office. Even if Taylor had wanted to, he perhaps could not have stopped the groundswell of determination within the Whig Party to elect him president in 1848.

Upon entering the White House, Taylor declared his intention to bring harmony to the Union. Yet his refusal to placate the South by allowing slavery in some of the new territories acquired during the Mexican war did quite the opposite. Within a year of Taylor's coming to office, the country seemed to be moving toward civil war. Only after his unexpected death in July 1850 did compromise on this divisive issue become possible.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,322 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement