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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Nacogdoches in Nacogdoches County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Texas Stagecoaches, C.S.A.

 
 
Texas Stagecoaches, C.S.A. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, February 2, 2002
1. Texas Stagecoaches, C.S.A. Marker
Inscription. At this site on the historic King's Highway, used since 1691, passengers boarded stagecoaches during the Civil War, 1861-65. Besides this stand, the town had 2 others, to serve 3 stage lines operating here.

Wm. Clark had the line to Mt. Pleasant, Haston & Lee the one to Tyler, and Sawyer & Risher (contractors for 15 Texas lines) the one to Waco.

Passengers for Waco boarded a coach at 6 a.m., and rode 4 days, 16 hours to the destination. Along the way some made connections for other places. In Waco there were stage lines to Henderson, San Antonio, Clarksville and Hempstead.

Schedules were shorter from here to Mt. Pleasant and Tyler. Nacogdoches was one of the best-served towns in Texas. Only 2 lines, both operating from Hempstead, had daily schedules, to Old Washington and to Austin. Cities with 5 lines included Austin, Waco and San Antonio. The port city of Indianola, later destroyed by storms, had 4 lines.

In all 31 stage lines operated in Confederate Texas, hauling mail, soldiers, civilians. 15 used 2-horse hacks, the others heavier coaches. All but 5 lines made connections with railroads or steamers, making possible extensive travel.
 
Erected 1964 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 9400.)
 
Marker series.
The King's Highway image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
2. The King's Highway
Panorama of main street in Nacogdoches; Stagecoach marker on corner in front of bank; Camino Real stone marker below and to right. Old Stone House marker on wall of bank, behind people.
This marker is included in the El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail marker series.
 
Location. 31° 36.179′ N, 94° 39.267′ W. Marker is in Nacogdoches, Texas, in Nacogdoches County. Marker is at the intersection of East Main Street and North Fredonia Street, on the right when traveling west on East Main Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Nacogdoches TX 75961, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of Nacogdoches (a few steps from this marker); The Fredonia Rebellion (within shouting distance of this marker); Ingraham Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Nacogdoches Federal Building / Post Office (within shouting distance of this marker); Homesite of John S. Roberts (within shouting distance of this marker); Gladys Hampton Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Chas. Hoya Land Office (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Nacogdoches (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Nacogdoches.
 
Also see . . .
1. El Camino De Nacogdoches. El Camino De Nacogdoches is one segment of the broader network of trails known as El Camino Real -- or King's Highway -- running from Mexico, across the Rio Grande and up to San Antonio,
King's Highway, Camino Real image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, February 2, 2002
3. King's Highway, Camino Real
A stone marker for the Camino Real is next to the Stage coach marker. It reads "King's Highway, Camino Real, Old San Antonio Road, Marker by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the State of Texas, AD 1919"
converging here in Nacogdoches, then running east to Natchitoches, Louisiana. Ruts are still visible in sections such as this one in Hays County. (Submitted on August 7, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

2. Old San Antonio Road. Wikipedia article on Old San Antonio Road, or "The King's Highway" (Submitted on August 7, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

3. Caddo Mound in Nacogdoches. Before it was a stage route, or Spain's "King's Highway", it would have been used by Indians such as the Caddo, for trade. The town of Nacogdoches takes its name from the Caddo Indian village that was located here, and some of whose ceremonial / burial mounds are still intact. (Submitted on August 7, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

4. Caddo Mounds State Historic Site. More Caddo mounds located southwest of here on the "King's Highway". (Submitted on August 7, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

5. Old Stone House (Fort). Handbook of Texas Online (Submitted on August 7, 2009, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 
 
Additional comments.
1.
The "King's Highway" is also known as El Camino Real, Old San Antonio Road, or sometimes just "OSR"
    — Submitted August 7, 2009, by Richard Denney
Old Stone House marker is affixed to bank's wall image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, February 2, 2002
4. Old Stone House marker is affixed to bank's wall
of Austin, Texas.

 
Additional keywords. El Camino Real, Old San Antonio Road, Old Stone House, Old Stone Fort
 
Categories. Hispanic AmericansNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
Old Stone House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, February 2, 2002
5. Old Stone House Marker
A marker on the bank wall describes the historic building originally at this location, before, during and after the stagecoach days. It reads "On this site stood for a century an OLD STONE HOUSE thought to have been built in 1779 by ANTONIO GIL YBARBO, Sold by him as community property in 1805, Headquarters in 1806 for William Barr and Samuel Davenport, Indian traders, it served as trading post, store, warehouse, town hall, fort, barracks, church, tavern and saloon before being torn down in 1902 by W.W. and Charles Perkins, last owners. Reconstructed in 1936 on the campus of Stephen F. Austin State Teachers College. This site marked by the State of Texas 1956"
Reconstructed Old Stone House (or Fort) image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, February 2, 2002
6. Reconstructed Old Stone House (or Fort)
The Old Stone House (or Fort as it is also called) as reconstructed in 1936 on the campus of Stephen F. Austin.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 1,692 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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