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Hancocks Bridge in Salem County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Old Bridges at this Location

Hancocks Bridge and the Revolution War

 
 
Old Bridges at this Location / Hancocks Bridge and the Revolution War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
1. Old Bridges at this Location / Hancocks Bridge and the Revolution War Marker
Inscription.
Old Bridges at this Location
The first bridge across Alloways Creek at this location was built by John Hancock and others in 1709 and was known as Hancocks Bridge.

The same year (1709) two other bridges were built across Alloways Creek, one at Alloway, known as Thompsonís Bridge, and the other at Quinton, often referred to as Quintonís Bridge.

Various other wooden bridges were built and rebuilt to replace the original bridge at this location. The last wooden bridge being built in 1847 by the Salem County Board of Chosen Freeholders.

On August 12, 1885, the construction of an iron truss swing bridge was authorized by the Board of Chosen Freeholders. This bridge was built at a cost of $8,517.92. On January 13, 1886, another contract was awarded for the sum of $1,835.00 to construct an additional span of fifty feet. Therefore, the cost of the iron swing bridge, which served this location from 1886 to 1952, was constructed at a cost of $10,352.92. The new bridge constructed in 1952-53 cost $532,894.00, one-half of which was assumed by the Federal Government.

Hancocks Bridge and the Revolution War
The bridge at this location figures largely in early American History. The bridge was used by the Americans to haul cattle and provisions to Gen. Washington at Valley Forge from the fertile lands
Markers in the town of Hancocks Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
2. Markers in the town of Hancocks Bridge
to the south. With the British moving into Salem, and the Americans holding the south side of Aloes (Alloways) Creek. The rebels decided to destroy the draw of the bridge in order to prevent a frontal attack.

However, the British decided to attack from the south, going by boat to an inlet about seven miles south of Aloes Creek. Because of the strong tide, they had to land at the mouth of Aloes Creek and cross the meadows to surprise the garrison at Hancocks Bridge. This resulted in the massacre at the Hancock House on the night of March 20, 1778, by Major John Graves Simcoe. On the morning of March 21, 1778, Major Simcoe relaid the bridge (by planks) and joined forces with Lt. Col. Mitchell, who had waited all night on the north side of the bridgeless stream.
 
Location. 39° 30.526′ N, 75° 27.638′ W. Marker is in Hancocks Bridge, New Jersey, in Salem County. Marker is at the intersection of Front Street and Locust Island Road, on the right when traveling south on Front Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Hancocks Bridge NJ 08038, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Waving Acres of Grass (a few steps from this marker); The Alloway Creek Watershed (a few steps from this marker); Patriots Massacred in the Hancock House
Markers on the Alloways Creek image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
3. Markers on the Alloways Creek
The marker, and several others, are located on the south side of the Alloways Creek.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Swedish Cabin (within shouting distance of this marker); Patterned Brick Houses (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hancock House (about 400 feet away); Hancock House Massacre (about 500 feet away); Quintonís Bridge (approx. 3.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Hancocks Bridge.
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsWar, US Revolutionary
 
Hancocks Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
4. Hancocks Bridge
This bridge, located just in front of the markers, is near the site of the Hancock House Massacre.
Quintons Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 12, 2009
5. Quintons Bridge
This bridge, located about 3½ miles north of Hancocks Bride, is at the location of one built in 1709 to span Alloways Creek.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 931 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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