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Abbeville in Abbeville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House
 
McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House Marker - Front Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, July 19, 2008
1. McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House Marker - Front
 
Inscription.
Front:
This 1888 Queen Anne house was the home of Gen. Samuel McGowan (1819-1897) until his death. McGowan, a lawyer, Confederate general, and jurist born in Laurens Co., had moved to Abbeville in 1841. He was an officer during the Mexican War and in the S.C. militia after it. During the Civil War he commanded the 14th S.C. Infantry 1862-63 and commanded a S.C. brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia 1863-65.

Reverse:
After 1865 McGowan bought a house on this lot. Built by Col. James Perrin in 1860, it burned in 1867; this house was built on the old foundation. McGowan served as a justice on the S.C. Supreme Court 1879-93. The Barksdale family bought the house in 1905, and WWII Gen. W.E. Barksdale was the last to live here. In 1989 his nephew J.D. Bundy gave it to the Abbeville County Historical Society as its headquarters.
 
Erected 2006 by Abbeville County Historic Society. (Marker Number 1-11.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina, Abbeville County Historical Society/Commission, and the South Carolina, Abbeville Historical Sites Tour marker series.
 
Location. 34° 10.792′ N, 82° 22.871′ W. Marker is in Abbeville, South Carolina, in Abbeville County
 
McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House Marker - Reverse Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, July 19, 2008
2. McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House Marker - Reverse
 
. Marker is at the intersection of North Main Street and Lane Street, on the left when traveling north on North Main Street. Click for map. Marker is located on the house grounds. Marker is at or near this postal address: 305 North Main Street, Abbeville SC 29620, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Last Cabinet Meeting Marker (a few steps from this marker); The Bundy-Barksdale-McGowan House (within shouting distance of this marker); Burt-Stark House / Jefferson Davis’s Flight (about 300 feet away, in a direct line); Maj. Thomas D. Howie (about 600 feet away); Abbeville's Confederate Colonels (approx. 0.2 miles away); Thomas Chiles Perrin House (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Old Livery Stable (approx. 0.2 miles away); Major Thomas Dry Howie (approx. 0.2 miles away); Clarence E. Pressley (approx. 0.2 miles away); Trinity Episcopal Church (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Abbeville.
 
More about this marker. The McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House is the 7th site on the Abbeville, South Carolina Historic Fitness Walk - North Trail.
 
Regarding McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House. The house (also known as the Generals House) is the 7th stop on the Abbeville History North Walking Trail.
 
Also see . . .
1. Biography of General Samuel McGowan. A son of Irish-Presbyterian immigrants to the United States, Samuel McGowan, though often wounded, excelled as a brigade commander in the Army of Northern Virginia. (Submitted on July 20, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Front Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, July 19, 2008
3. McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Front
 

2. Queen Anne Architecture. Reigning Style of the Industrial Age By Jackie Craven, About.com (Submitted on August 25, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. 14th SC Infantry Regiment. In response to a call from President Davis, about the 1st of July, 1861, a large number of infantry companies, from all quarters of South Carolina, rendezvoused at Columbia, South Carolina. (Submitted on November 14, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. McGowan’s Brigade at Spotsylvania’s Bloody Angle by Mac Wyckoff. Precisely ten years ago (May 12, 1989) today I found a gentleman staring out across the fields in front of the Confederate works at the Bloody Angle. (Submitted on November 14, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. General Samuel McGowan. Samuel McGowan (October 19, 1819 – August 9, 1897) was a general from South Carolina in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. (Submitted on November 14, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Samuel McGowan: Original Member of the Aztec Club of 1847. Born in the Crosshill section of Laurens District, South Carolina, he was the son of Irish immigrants. (Submitted on November 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Samuel McGowan (Find a Grave Memorial). Born in Laurens District, South Carolina, McGowan attended the school of Thomas Lewis Lesly, and the South Carolina College of which he graduated in 1841. (Submitted on November 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Side Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, July 19, 2008
4. McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Side
 

8. The History of a Brigade of South Carolinians, Known 1st as "Gregg's" & "McGowan Brigade". Account of the brigade by James Fits James Caldwell in 1866. (Submitted on November 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. Abbeville Historic District. The Abbeville Historic District is comprised of a large portion of the city of Abbeville, the county seat of Abbeville County, South Carolina. (Submitted on December 26, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. The Generals House
The House
The McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House was designed by Atlanta architect G.L. Norman and is an excellent example of the Queen Anne style, characterized by towers, turrets, multi-faceted roofs, the utilization of windows in different sizes and shapes and the use of various textures in exterior materials. It is often referred to locally as 'The Generals' House' because two of its principle owners were Generals - Confederate Brigadier General Samuel McGowan and WWII General William E. Barksdale, the last owner to dwell in the house.

The outside of the house is painted with the Victorian multi-colors originally used, as determined by scientific paint analysis. Confederate General Samuel McGowan had this house built on the foundation
 
The Bundy-Barksdale-McGowan House -<br>Front Entrance Detail Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, February 3, 2009
5. The Bundy-Barksdale-McGowan House -
Front Entrance Detail
The architect was G.L. Norman of Atlanta. The property is included in the Abbeville Historic District. National Register medallion to the left of the door.
 
of his Gothic Revival style house which was destroyed by fire in 1887. He had purchased the earlier house from the widow of Lt. Colonel James M. Perrin, CSA, who was killed at the battle of Chancellorsville.

The construction of the existing house was completed in 1888, as noted in the chimney display on the right side of the house. The house has 4 levels, (1) the basement level which houses 8 rooms where various domestic activities took place; (2) the main floor which consists of a large living hall, a library, a parlor, and a dining room; (3) the upstairs level which includes 4 bedrooms radiating from a central hall; (4) the commodious attic. Many interesting architectural features can be found throughout the house such as built-in-furniture, pocket windows, a coffered ceiling, and windows of multi-colored glass. The influence of the 19th century English architect, Charles Locke Eastlake is seen in the abundant use of solid woods and in the simple and rectangular style of the woodwork.

The Servant Cabins
Behind the main house are 3 servant cabins. The first two cabins, closest in proximity to the back of the house, were built during the era of the Gothic Revival style house (circa 1857). The third cabin on the left was erected after the current house was constructed, probably around the early 1900's. Each cabin consists of one room with several windows
 
McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Corner Tower Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, July 19, 2008
6. McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Corner Tower
The Generals House is the current home of the Abbeville County Historical Society and the Jane Greene Center for the Arts.
 
and a single entrance. All three were well constructed although the first two are more interesting architecturally with their very steep roofs and decorative gingerbread trim. The earlier two buildings with their original plaster walls are extremely rare and are among the few remaining servant cabins in the upstate.

General Samuel McGowan
At the time he built this house in 1887-88, General Samuel McGowan had distinguished himself as a staff captain in the Mexican War, as a successful lawyer, as a member of the S.C. House of Representatives, and as a Brigadier General leading McGowan's Brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia of the Confederate Army. In 1879, he became an Associate Justice of the S.C. Supreme Court, a position he held until 1893. Upon retirement from the bench. McGowan spent his last years in this house, surrounded by family and friends. He died at home on August 9, 1897, and is buried in Long Cane Cemetery.

In 2005-06, the Society received a significant acquisition of General McGowan's personal property and family items, including photographs, books, and silver from Mr. and Mrs. William McGowan Matthew. Mr. Matthew is the great-grandson of the General.

The Abbeville County Historical Society
The Society, founded in 1957, is dedicated to the preservation of materials and architectures which have historic significance
 
McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Rear Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, June 6, 2009
7. McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Rear
 
to Abbeville County. The major purpose is to share all that is preserved with Abbeville County residents and visitors to the County, now and in the future. The current focus of the Society is to continue to preserve and restore the McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House, which serves as Society headquarters, a museum and the Jane Greene Center for the Arts. The house, a true architectural treasure, was graciously deeded to the Society by Mr. J.D. Bundy, of Monroe, N.C., in December 1989. Mr. Bundy purchased the property from the estate of his aunt and uncle, General and Mrs. William Barksdale. Mr. Bundy mandated that the property be maintained as a historic site and all of Abbeville County is indebted to him for his foresight and generosity. (Source: The General's House, brochure printed by the Abbeville County Historical Society)
    — Submitted November 14, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. General's House
Two-and-one-half-story, frame residence built in the Queen Anne style. The first story is sheathed in weatherboarding and the second story in shake shingles. There is a hip roof of slate. Centrally located on the facade is a projecting, two-tiered portico with gambrel roof. The first level of the portico is supported by plain wood columns on brick piers. The balcony has plain wood columns on paneled wood piers with a turned balustrade. There is an oval window on the gambrel end. At the right corner of the facade is a two-story, round tower with cinical roof and metal finial. A small, polygonal dormer projects from the front roof slope. There is a single story porch on the facade and left elevation, above which is a small, recessed balcony and gabled dormer. (Source: Abbeville Historic District National Register Nomination Form.)
 
McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House -<br>Three Slave Cabins in Rear of Property Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, June 6, 2009
8. McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House -
Three Slave Cabins in Rear of Property
 
    — Submitted July 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

3. McGowan's Duel
On Saturday, March 16, 1844, Samuel McGowan and Col. John Cunningham met north of the village of Hamburg for a duel. Weapons were U.S. Yaugers and the distance was 30 paces. McGowan was severely wounded in the back of his neck, but the wound was not fatal. The duel was witnessed by a crowd of at least 200. Louis T. Wigfall was Cunningham's second; B.Y. Martin was McGowan's. The cause of the duel was not recorded. (Source: Old Abbeville: Scenes of the Past of a Town Where Old Times are not Forgotten, by Lowry Ware (1992), pgs 45-46.)
    — Submitted May 3, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

4. McGowan the Attorney
As one of Abbeville's most respected attorneys, Samuel McGowan was often involved in several high profile cases involving slaves. In April 1851, McGowan brought charges against three slaves. They were accused of planning an insurrection. Austin and Asa were both given one hundred and fifty lashes and ordered to leave the state. The third slave, Taffy, was given twenty five and discharged. It was felt that Taffy was less involved than the other two, his only real crime was being at the
 
McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Slave Cabin (1 of 3) Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, June 6, 2009
9. McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Slave Cabin (1 of 3)
 
wrong place at the wrong time. However, public sentiment was strongly against the three and it was felt that Taffy's needed punishment as a warning to others.

In 1857, McGowan served as the prosecuting attorney in a case where a slave named Josh (owned by Dr. S.S. Marshall) was accused of the murder of a slave named Andy (owned by Abram Littles). Josh was convicted of the murder and sentenced to six months in prison and given 600 lashes, to be delivered twice a month, 50 lashes at a time.

In January 1875. McGowan again found himself in court. This time, he was a defense attorney, representing his, F.B. Houston, on charges of bigamy. Houston was charged with marrying Ida Lawson on or about December 30, 1874 and then marrying Carrie Davis on or about January 2, 1875. To make matters worse, Lawson was white while Davis was black. Davis was rich and spoiled while Davis was poor and uneducated. Both wives testified before the jury and the packed court room. Houston was convicted and sentenced to five years imprisonment. .(Source: Old Abbeville: Scenes of the Past of a Town Where Old Times are not Forgotten, by Lowry Ware (1992).)
    — Submitted May 3, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

5. Samuel McGowan's Brigade
Samuel McGowan. — Samuel McGowan was a
 
McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Slave Cabin (2 of 3) Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, June 6, 2009
10. McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Slave Cabin (2 of 3)
 
native of Laurens County, where he was born in 1820. At the age of twenty-one he was graduated from South Carolina College. He became a lawyer at Abbeville and was very successful. In 1846 he went to Mexico with the Palmetto Regiment and was made captain. Afterwards he continued his work as lawyer at Abbeville until the trumpet of war sounded. Then he hurried away to Charleston to aid in the capture of Fort Sumter. He went thence to Virginia and took part in the first battle of Manassas.

McGowan Becomes Commander of Gregg's Brigade. — In 1862 McGowan became colonel of the Fourteenth Regiment of Gregg's brigade. After the death of General Gregg, McGowan was made commander in his place and from that time onward this body of men was known as McGowan's brigade. General McGowan spent the winter of 1862 with his men near the battlefield of Fredericksburg. They built log huts and plastered them with mud and called their village by the name of Camp Gregg. In May, 1863, they seized their muskets and marched into the thickets to take part in the battle of Chancellors ville.

McGowan's Brigade at Chancellorsville. — After Stonewall Jackson was wounded in the woods at Chancellorsville, McGowan's brigade was led forward with the other brigades of A.P. Hill's division, to form the front part of the Confederate line of battle. They lay down under the
 
McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Slave Cabin (3 of 3) Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, June 6, 2009
11. McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House - Slave Cabin (3 of 3)
 
pine-trees and slept until morning. In the early light of the morning they saw just before them the log breastworks piled up by the Federal troops. Cannon and muskets began to be fired behind the logs. The Confederates replied to this fire and the battle was soon raging. A great cloud of smoke from the guns settled down upon the forest and the flashing of muskets was like fire in the darkness. McGowan stood near the flag of the First Regiment and cheered on his men. Then he mounted a log and stood in full view urging his troops to advance. A musket ball struck him, and as he fell Colonel Edwards, of the Thirteenth Regiment, rushed forward and led the brigade towards the log breastworks. As the brigade advanced Colonel Edwards was shot. Then Col. Abner Perrin, of the Fourteenth Regiment, led the brigade forward. At the same time the whole Confederate army rushed against the Federal position and drove the Federal soldiers out of the wilderness.

McGowan's Brigade at Gettysburg. — At the beginning of the first day's battle at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania (July 1, 1863), a strong Federal force held the top of a long slope. A Confederate line advanced part of the way up the slope and fought with muskets. The battle went on and many men fell on both sides, but still the Federal troops held the top of the slope. McGowan's brigade was sent forward. When the men started
 
Harold B. & Verna V. Bateman Lightpost Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
12. Harold B. & Verna V. Bateman Lightpost
In Loving Memory
They instilled in others a love of history, antiques, restoration and preservation.
Their light still burns brightly.
 
up the hill they found the ground covered with dead and wounded Confederates. They moved on and the other Confederates gave a cheer for South Carolina. The enemy began to pour grapeshot into them, but the line of the Carolinians went up that hill in regular order, as if on parade. When balls and shot and shell were raining upon them in a torrent, Col. Abner Perrin, the brigade's commander, spurred his horse through his own line, passed to the front, waved his sword and called his men to follow. A great shout went up from every throat when the men saw their daring leader in front of them. One rapid rush, with men falling at every step, and they gained the top of the slope, seized the enemy's cannon, and scattered the opposing force. The flag of the First Regiment was the first Confederate banner raised in the town of Gettysburg.

McGowan's Brigade in Northern Virginia. — Early in May, 1864, Lee wished to strike the first blow at Grant in the Wilderness of northern Virginia. General McGowan's wound had healed, and he led his brigade forward with the rest of the Confederates. The Carolinians took position for a moment upon a ridge. The cannon were already roaring some distance away. Orr's regiment of riflemen knelt down and uncovered their heads and offered prayer to the God of battles. The sharp crack of rifles came nearer and nearer, but the voice of the chaplain,
 
The Promenade Garden Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, February 3, 2009
13. The Promenade Garden
Base of the urn reads:
"The Promenade Garden"
Honoring
Bessie Lee Nance
ACHS Treasurer 1972 to 1999
and Charter Member
Erected October 20, 2003
 
Francis P. Mullally, was heard above the sound of fighting. Then the entire brigade advanced to the attack. Nobly they did their part in that fierce struggle which ended with the repulse of Grant.

A few days later Lee and Grant fought a great battle at Spottsylvania. Grant captured a part of Lee's breastwork. McGowan's brigade with a Mississippi brigade was sent to drive Grant's men away. The logs were piled up high and there was a trench dug on each side of the works. The Carolinians stood on one side of the pile of logs and the Federal troops on the other side. Some men tlyust their muskets between the logs and fired. Some climbed to the top and shot down from above. Others put the muzzles of their rifles over the top log and blazed away. The terrible struggle went on for twenty hours. The rain was falling nearly all the time and the trenches were filled with water. The men stood and lay in this water, which soon became red with blood. Bushes and even trees were cut down by the rifle bullets. This awful place was known as the Bloody Angle. Carolinians and Mississippians were the heroes of the famous fight. General McGowan received a wound and was taken from the field. Col. J.N. Brown, of the Fourteenth Regiment, commanded the brigade throughout the battle until Grant was forced to march away from the field.

The next leader of the brigade was Gen. James Conner,
 
Samuel McGowan<br>October 19, 1819 – August 9, 1897 Photo, Click for full size
By NPS.gov, circa 1861
14. Samuel McGowan
October 19, 1819 – August 9, 1897
Ass. Just. S.C. Supreme Court 1879-1893
 
a lawyer from Charleston, who had entered the Confederate war as a captain in the Hampton Legion. Then General McGowan came again as commander and continued with the brigade until the surrender of Lee, at Appomattox. After the war, General McGowan became a judge. He died in the year 1895. (Source: The Making of South Carolina by Henry Alexander White (1906), pgs 239-241.)
    — Submitted July 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

6. William Campbell and Clelia Peronneau McGowan
After General McGowan's death, his son and daughter-in-law, William Campbell McGowan and Clelia Peronneau Mathewes, lived in the house until William McGowan's death in 1898. It was William who oversaw the construction of the house. After William's death, Clelia moved to Charleston where she became the first female member of the Charleston City Council (1923). During her life, she also served as president of the South Carolina United Daughters of the Confederacy (1897-1899).
    — Submitted November 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

7. Obituary of William Campbell "Willie" McGowan
Laurensville Herald
March 4, 1898

Capt. William C. McGowan died at his home at Abbeville, on the 27th ult. The deceased was a young man of brilliant intellect and bright promise of future usefulness and distinction. He was the only son of the late Judge Samuel McGowan. Perhaps no young man had more warm admirers and strong personal friends than did Willie McGowan.

The proceedings of Court were brought to a sudden termination at noon on Thursday of last week by the receipt of a telegram to Judge Benet, conveying the sad intelligence that his brother-in-law, Capt. W.C. McGowan, was extremely ill, and not expected to live more than a few hours. A recess was ordered and the Judge left for Abbeville. He returned Monday last, Capt. McGowan having died the evening previous, ordering an extra term to begin on April 19th.
 
Gen. Samuel McGowan Reviewing Troops -<br>Charleston Hotel Photo, Click for full size
By Harper's Weekly, 1861
15. Gen. Samuel McGowan Reviewing Troops -
Charleston Hotel
 
    — Submitted November 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

8. Marker Style
The marker shown reflects the third style of South Carolina Historical Markers. It is currently in use and has been since 1996. The original design was cast aluminum and crowned with a bas relief of the state flag surrounded by an inverted triangle. The markers were painted silver with black lettering.
    — Submitted September 16, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

9. Society wants to preserve servant homes
By JENNIFER COLTON/ jcolton@indexjournal.com
Friday, February 6, 2009 12:13 AM EST

ABBEVILLE -- No one knows how many people have lived in the three one-room servant cabins sheltered behind the McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House, but historians recognize the need to preserve the unusual 150-year-old buildings that dozens might have called home.

Often called The General’s House, the McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House is unusual itself.

Located on North Main Street, the mansion features its own tower, a turret, multi-faceted roofs and windows in different sizes and shapes.

The building’s nickname follows its two most prominent owners, both generals: Confederate Gen.
 
William Campbell McGowan<br>(1858-1898) Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
16. William Campbell McGowan
(1858-1898)
 
Samuel McGowan, who bought the property in 1865, and WWII Gen. W.E. Barksdale, the last owner to live in the home.

In its heyday, a time of carriages and wealth, multiple buildings would have stood behind the main home, including a kitchen building, stable, chicken coop and slave or servant quarters. Of all the adjoining buildings, only three remain: the raised one-room cabins built for the household servants.

“The family was a well-to-do family, and they would have had a lot of servants. You had people to do the cooking, butlers, people to care for fireplaces, somebody to take care of the horses,” Abbeville County Historic Society President Bob Speer said Thursday. “We don’t know if it was one family or multiple, but numerous people probably lived in each of these buildings.”

Two of the buildings date back to the 1850s and follow the gothic revival style of the first home, destroyed in a fire in 1887. The family rebuilt on the foundations of the old home the next year but moved away from the gothic revival style to the multi-colored Queen Anne still standing; the third cabin dates back to the 1880s or 1890s after the completion of the new home.

“Back in that period of time, people had really big families with seven or eight kids because the mortality rate was so high,” he said. “We haven’t been able to
 
Clelia Peronneau Mathewes McGowan Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
17. Clelia Peronneau Mathewes McGowan
 
obtain any early pictures of the house, so we don’t really now what furnishing were in the house, and we’ve never seen any pictures that show family activities or any of the people who were their servants.”

Images of the families have not survived, but the buildings have, making them a rare find, Speer said.

“In the Upstate, these are some of the very few servant cabins that still exist,” he said. “The buildings were well made, and the pitch of the roof helped save them. At some point the family put a tin roof on, and with those two things, the water never got in and they didn’t rot. That’s why they lasted, whereas the barn was probably a cedar shingle roof, and we’ve lost that.”

But it isn’t just the buildings’ longevity that makes them unusual.

“What’s surprising about these houses is that they were done in the gothic style, so they are very tall, with high ceilings,” he said. “We think the gingerbread is original, which is very unusual.”

Both the gingerbread trim -- wood boards carved into delicate, decorative patterns for trimming gables, windows, porches or, in this case, roofing -- and the buildings’ steep, pitched roofs are typical of gothic revival architecture. The 14-foot tall ceilings would also have helped residents avoid the summer heat, and in the winter open fireplaces
 
General William E. Barksdale -<br>Commanding Officer of the 1330th Army Air Force Base Unit Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
18. General William E. Barksdale -
Commanding Officer of the 1330th Army Air Force Base Unit
Painting hangs in an upstairs room. The 1330th Army Air Force Base Unit, Air Transport Command, India-China Division, which was stationed in Jorhat, India.
 
-- later plastered over when pot-bellied stoves were installed -- kept the space warm.

“People lived in these houses up until the 1950s, when they moved on to better opportunities. The Depression lasted all the way up to World War I, and there were very poor economic conditions in South Carolina,” Speer said. “People took what they could afford.”

The cabins now belong to the Abbeville County Historic Society, along with the rest of the McGowan-Barksdale-Bundy House property. Although any original furnishings are gone, the society is slowly stocking the buildings with period items collected from across Abbeville County, including old tables and large cast-iron pots once placed by the fireplace and used to boil water and wash clothes. Shutters cover the windows, and the buildings are kept closed and locked to protect them.

“We’re hoping to do some restoration work on these servant cabins,” Speer said. “They’re a part of Abbeville’s history, and they’re very important because so few of them exist.”
    — Submitted February 8, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

10. McGowan-Gary-Hagen House ("Magazine Hill") - McGowan's Home Prior to the General's House
One-and-one-half-story, weatherboard raised cottage with gable roof. Central, single door entrance with sidelights and transom has a formal entablature and is flanked by paired, shuttered, floor-length windows. Porch across facade is supported by paired, octagonal, wood columns and has an early wright-iron balustrade. A pedimented portico with carved brackers projects from the central bay and is also supported by paired octagonal columns. Two corbelled and stuccoed interior chimneys pierce the roof, which had a boxed cornice with returns. This house was moved from a nearby location on Magazine Street circa 1919. (Source: National Register nomination form.)
 
Gen. Barksdale's Effects Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
19. Gen. Barksdale's Effects
 
    — Submitted July 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

11. 1330th Army Air Force
The 1330th Army Air Force Base Unit was part of the India-China Wing of the Air Transport Command. It was formerly known as Station 21. It was awarded a Distinguished Unit Citation for actions in December 1943, per War Dept General order #18/1944. A Base Unit was responsible for supporting an air field (personnel, administration, mess hall, supply, transportation, etc.). It was one of the airfields responsible for the Hump airlift to China. (Source: Posting by barker944, 03/25/09, http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/lofiversion/index.php/t7503.html.)
    — Submitted June 20, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
 
The John William Rogers II Library Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
20. The John William Rogers II Library
Named in tribute to Bill Rogers for his
dedication, devotion and many contributions
to the Abbeville County Historical Society.
President
1992-1999
 
 
Bear Skin Rug in the Robers Library Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
21. Bear Skin Rug in the Robers Library
 
 
The Kathryn and William McGowan Matthew Dining Room Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
22. The Kathryn and William McGowan Matthew Dining Room
Dedicated to them April 2, 2006
in honor of their continued support
and generous contributions of the
McGowan Family Collection.
 
 
Matthew Dining Room Chandelier Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
23. Matthew Dining Room Chandelier
The chandelier is not original to the house.
 
 
The Jane Elizabeth Harrison Ladies' Parlor Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
24. The Jane Elizabeth Harrison Ladies' Parlor
In Loving Memory
05/24/1912 - 03/09/2000

In tribute to Jane Harrison for her
outstanding leadership and achievements
as president of the
Abbeville County Historical Society
and in deepest appreciation for her determination
and zeal in helping the society
acquire its headquarters.
 
 
Painting Over Fireplace is of Clelia<br>Peronneau Matthewes McGowan Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
25. Painting Over Fireplace is of Clelia
Peronneau Matthewes McGowan
 
 
The Carol V. Bateman Tower Room Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
26. The Carol V. Bateman Tower Room
President of ACHS 1999 - 2003

In recognition of her many years of
service, dedication, diligence,
preservation efforts and contributions
to this society.
We remain grateful.
 
 
The Carol V. Bateman Tower Room Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
27. The Carol V. Bateman Tower Room
 
 
Staircase Leading to Second Floor -<br>Grandfather Clock on First Landing Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
28. Staircase Leading to Second Floor -
Grandfather Clock on First Landing
 
 
Second Floor Landing Overlooking Staircase Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
29. Second Floor Landing Overlooking Staircase
 
 
Second Floor Tower Sitting Room Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
30. Second Floor Tower Sitting Room
 
 
Second Floor Apothecary Collection Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
31. Second Floor Apothecary Collection
 
 
Second Floor Apothecary Collection Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
32. Second Floor Apothecary Collection
 
 
Gen. Samuel McGowan Crypt - South Side<br>Long Cane Cemetery, Abbeville, SC Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, December 23, 2008
33. Gen. Samuel McGowan Crypt - South Side
Long Cane Cemetery, Abbeville, SC
[South]:
Samuel McGowan
Born in Laurens County, 9 October 1819
Died in Abbeville County, 9 August 1897
Go soldier to thy honor and rest
Thy truth and valour bearing
The bravest are the tenderest
The loving are the daring

[East]:
A hero of two wars
Seven times wounded
A leader at the bar
A wise lawgiver
A righteous judge
He rest from his labours
And his works do follow him
 
 
Gen. Samuel McGowan Crypt -<br>Southwest Corner<br>Long Cane Cemetery, Abbeville, SC Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, December 23, 2008
34. Gen. Samuel McGowan Crypt -
Southwest Corner
Long Cane Cemetery, Abbeville, SC
[West]:
The Mexican War, 1846-1848,
Captain, U.S.A.
The Confederate War, 1861-1865,
Brigadier General, C.S.A.
Member of the Legislature, 1849-1860,
Elected to Congress, 1866
Associate Justice Supreme Court
of South Carolina, 1878-1894
 
 
Gen. Samuel McGowan Crypt - North Side<br>Long Cane Cemetery, Abbeville, SC Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, May 2, 2009
35. Gen. Samuel McGowan Crypt - North Side
Long Cane Cemetery, Abbeville, SC
[North]:
From humble birth he rose to highest honour in civic and military life. A patriot and a leader of men. In peace his country called him; he waited not her call in war. A man's strength, a woman's tenderness, a child's simplicity were his, and his a heart of charity, fulfilling the law in love. He did good and not evil all the days of his life, and at the end, his country, his children and children's children rise up and call him blessed.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on July 20, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 5,065 times since then. Last updated on August 17, 2009, by Clelia McGowan LaMonica of Marshall,, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 20, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on May 3, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on July 20, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7, 8. submitted on July 20, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   9, 10, 11. submitted on July 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   12, 13, 14. submitted on May 3, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   15. submitted on July 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32. submitted on May 3, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   33. submitted on December 26, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   34, 35. submitted on May 3, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
 
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