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Batesburg-Leesville in Lexington County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
Pinarea / Quattlebaum Sawmill, Flour Mill, and Rifle Factory
 
Pinarea Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, August 22, 2009
1. Pinarea Marker
 
Inscription.
Pinarea
Pinarea, the plantation owned by soldier, statesman, and manufacturer Paul Quattlebaum (1812-1890), was a mile E. Quattlebaum was a captain in the Seminole War and a brig. gen, in the S.C. militia by 1843. He was a state representative 1840-43, state senator 1848-52, and delegate to the Secession Convention and signer of the Ordinance of Secession. He is buried in the cemetery at Pinarea.

Quattlebaum Sawmill, Flour Mill, and Rifle Factory
The Quattlebaums operated a sawmill, flour mill, and rifle factory near here. The mills were both powered by Lightwood Knot Creek. The sawmill had a turbine wheel and circular saw. The rifle factory, founded by Paul's father John (1774-1853), was leased to the Confederate government to make percussion rifles.
 
Erected 2006 by Lexington County Camps (no. 22, 51, and 412), Sons of Confederate Veterans. (Marker Number 32-33.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Sons of Confederate Veterans/United Confederate Veterans marker series.
 
Location. 33° 50.1′ N, 81° 28.383′ W. Marker is in Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina, in Lexington County. Marker is at the intersection of Fairview Road
 
Pinarea Marker, looking south along Fairview Road (U.S. 178) Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, April 13, 2010
2. Pinarea Marker, looking south along Fairview Road (U.S. 178)
 
(U.S. 178) and Bagpipe Road, on the right when traveling south on Fairview Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Batesburg SC 29006, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Moorefield Memorial Highway (approx. 2.1 miles away); Hartley House (approx. 6 miles away); Lee's Tavern Site (approx. 6.1 miles away); Revolutionary Skirmish Near Juniper Springs (approx. 7.3 miles away); Lewie Chapel (Old Gilbert Methodist Church) / The Lewie Family (approx. 7.8 miles away); Jacob Odom House (approx. 8.4 miles away); Alexander Hamilton Stevens (approx. 9.9 miles away); Ridge Spring Cemetery / W.H. Scarborough (approx. 10 miles away); Ridge Hill School / Faith Cabin Library (approx. 10.8 miles away); Ridge Spring (approx. 10.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Batesburg-Leesville.
 
Also see . . .
1. General Paul Quattlebaum Homeplace, Lexington Co., SC. The location of Gen. Quattlebaum's homeplace is on Quattlebaum Rd. which turns to the south off Two Notch Rd. near Leesville, SC. (Submitted on August 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Paul Thomas Brodie (Grandson of Gen. Paul Quattlebaum). Paul Thomas Brodie was the third department head of mathematics at Clemson, serving in this position in the years 1899-1907. (Submitted on August 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Quattlebaum Sawmill, Flour Mill, and Rifle Factory Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, August 22, 2009
3. Quattlebaum Sawmill, Flour Mill, and Rifle Factory Marker
 

3. Seminole Wars. The Seminole Wars, also known as the Florida Wars, were three conflicts in Florida between various groups of Native Americans collectively known as Seminoles and the United States. (Submitted on August 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. About the Quattlebaums
General Paul Quattlebaum was born July 8, 1812, in Lexington District, South Carolina, the son of Captain john and Mette Burkett Quattlebaum. Educated in local schools, at the age of eighteen he married Sarah Caroline Jones Prothro of Edgefield District. He served as an officer in the Seminole War of 1835-36, and upon returning home was commissioned colonel and later brigadier general in the South Carolina Militia. An active planter and industrialist, Quattlebaum's ventures included lumber and flour mills and a rifle factory. He served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1840-44). the State Senate (1848-52), and was a signer of the Ordinance of Secession. General Paul Quattlebaum died October 18, 1890. Among his several surviving children was Cephas Perry Quattlebaum. Cephas Perry Quattlebaum was born in Lexington District, South Carolina, on May 19, 1851. He received his early education from private tutors and read
 
Pinarea Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, August 22, 2009
4. Pinarea Marker
 
law in the office of Major H. A. Meetze, a local attorney. Gaining admittance to the South Carolina Bar in 1874, he soon moved to Conwayborough (now Conway), South Carolina and began practicing law in partnership with W. D. Johnson and J. Monroe Johnson. He took an active part as a "Red Shirt" in the gubernatorial campaign of 1876 and organized a rifle club in Horry County. Heavily involved in fraternal organizations and civic affairs, Cephas Perry Quattlebaum led the movement for the incorporation of the town of Conway in 1898 and served as its first mayor. He married Janette Taylor McQueen (1852-1927) of Chesterfield County, South Carolina, on December 23, 1884. His oldest child, Paul, was born two years later. Cephas Perry Quattlebaum died July 20, 1929.

Paul Quattlebaum was born February 25, 1886, at Conway, South Carolina. He attended private schools and received a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical and mechanical engineering from Clemson Agricultural College in 1907. While at Clemson. Quattlebaum served as president of the Calhoun Literary Society, treasurer of the Y.M.C.A., secretary of the college Sunday School, and exchange editor of The Tiger.

Following graduation Quattlebaum returned to Conway and embarked on careers in business and politics. He organized the Conway Light and Power Company in 1907 and subsequently founded the Quattlebaum
 
Quattlebaum Sawmill, Flour Mill, and Rifle Factory Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott, August 22, 2009
5. Quattlebaum Sawmill, Flour Mill, and Rifle Factory Marker
 
Ice Company (1912) and the Quattlebaum Light and Ice Company (1915) working as chief executive of this firm until his retirement in 1930. Paul Quattlebaum represented Horry County in the South Carolina Senate from 1935 to 1944. He sat on various Senate committees and took a personal interest in the oversight of the State Historical Commission, now known as the South Carolina Department of Archives and History. Agitation by Senator Quattlebaum to enhance the facilities of the Medical College of South Carolina resulted in the dramatic growth of that school. He followed politics avidly throughout his life and after his retirement became involved in the Eisenhower presidential campaign of 1952.

After leaving the Senate Quattlebaum focused his efforts on historical and genealogical research and church and civic affairs. His publishing credits include a massive genealogical project entitled "Quattlebaum: A Palatine Family in South Carolina" which appeared in the South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine (1947-48) and The Land Called Chicora (1956), a scholarly monograph dealing with early European settlements on the South Carolina coast. His civic interests involved serving on the Board of Trustees of Queens College (1930-1964), being President of the Conway Chamber of Commerce (1935-36; 1944-45), President of the Conway Lions Club (1956-57), and life
 
Quattlebaum Sawmill, Flour Mill, and Rifle Factory Marker, looking north along Fairview Road Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, April 13, 2010
6. Quattlebaum Sawmill, Flour Mill, and Rifle Factory Marker, looking north along Fairview Road
 
member of the Horry County Library Commission. A lifelong Presbyterian, Paul Quattlebaum was a ruling elder of Kingston Presbyterian Church (1907-64) in Conway and devoted himself to local, state, and denomination-wide church activities.

Quattlebaum married Sue Martin of Marion, South Carolina, November 22. 1911. They had four children: Paul, Jr., Laura Janette. Katherine McQueen. and Sue Martin. Paul Quattlebaum died August 9, 1964. (Source: Register of the Quattlebaum Papers, pgs 2-4.)
    — Submitted August 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Credits. This page originally submitted on August 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 3,148 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on August 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2. submitted on July 28, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3, 4, 5. submitted on August 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on July 28, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
 
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