Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Shiloh in Hardin County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Army of the Ohio

Major General Don Carlos Buell

 
 
Army of the Ohio Tablet image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 16, 2009
1. Army of the Ohio Tablet
Inscription.
U.S.
Army of the Ohio.
Major General Don Carlos Buell.

Second Division, Brig. Gen. Alex McD. McCook.
Fourth Division, Brig. Gen. William Nelson.
Fifth Division, Brig. Gen. Thomas L. Crittenden.
Sixth Division, Brig. Gen. Thomas J. Wood.

The advance of the Army of the Ohio arrived at Savannah, Tenn. from Nashville April 5, 1862. Nelson's Division marched on Sunday, April 6, up the east side of the Tennessee River to a point opposite Pittsburg Landing. At 5 p.m. Ammen's Brigade was brought over the river and assisted in repelling the last attack made by the Confederates upon the Union lines. The remainder of General Nelson's Division and General Crittenden's Division arrived on the field during Sunday night. McCook's Division arrived early Monday morning. Wagner's Brigade of General Wood's Division arrived at 12 noon; Garfield's Brigade about 3 o'clock P.m., too late to take part in the battle.

In the attack upon the Confederates on Monday the Army of the Ohio occupied the left of the Union line; McCook's Division on the Corinth Road, Nelson's Division on the left and Crittenden's Division in the center. When Wood's Division came upon the field it took position between McCook and Crittenden.

The Confederates were driven back until about 4 p.m. when they retired from the field.

The
Orientation Tablets at Shiloh Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
2. Orientation Tablets at Shiloh Church
Army of the Ohio had engaged, including Wagner's Brigade, present for duty, officers and men, 17,918.

Its casualties were, killed 241, wounded 1807, missing 55, Total 2103.
 
Erected by Shiloh National Military Park Commission. (Marker Number B 2.)
 
Location. 35° 8.036′ N, 88° 21.317′ W. Marker is near Shiloh, Tennessee, in Hardin County. Marker is on Corinth-Pittsburg Landing Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Located at stop seven, Shiloh Church, in Shiloh National Military Park. Marker is in this post office area: Shiloh TN 38376, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Army of the Tennessee (here, next to this marker); Army of the Mississippi (here, next to this marker); Battery B, 1st Illinois Light Artillery (a few steps from this marker); Shiloh Church (a few steps from this marker); Shiloh United Methodist Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Shiloh Log Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Shiloh School (within shouting distance of this marker); 17th Illinois Infantry (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Shiloh.
 
More about this marker. This is one of three duplicated
Explaination of the Tablet System at Shiloh image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
3. Explaination of the Tablet System at Shiloh
Shiloh features a rather complex set of tablets to interpret the movements of the armies. Each army uses a different color scheme - blue for the Army of the Tennessee, yellow for the Army of the Ohio, and red for the Confederate Army of the Mississippi. The different shapes of the tablets indicate which day the action described took place. "House" shaped tablets indicate camp sites.
tablets in the park outlining the actions of the Army of the Ohio.
 
Also see . . .
1. Army of the Ohio. Organization and brief description of the actions of the Army of the Ohio. (Submitted on August 23, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Report of Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell. In his report, Buell described the confusion at Pittsburg Landing on the first day of the battle:
The throng of disorganized and demoralized troops increased continually by fresh fugitives from the battle, which steadily drew nearer the Landing, and with these were mingled great numbers of teams, all striving to get as near as possible to the river. With few exceptions all efforts to form the troops and move them forward to the fight utterly failed. (Submitted on August 23, 2009, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Protection of the National Military Parks image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
4. Protection of the National Military Parks
A tablet on the end of the cluster provides the full text of an Act passed by Congress on March 3, 1897 which provided for protection of the military parks. The five original parks were Chickamauga-Chattanooga, Shiloh, Gettysburg, Antietam, and Vicksburg.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 607 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement