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Middletown in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Middletown

Enemies and Friends

 

—Antietam Campaign 1862 —

 
Middletown – Enemies and Friends Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
1. Middletown – Enemies and Friends Marker
Inscription. When Gen. Robert E. Lee and part of the Army of Northern Virginia passes through Middletown on September 10–11, 1862, they encountered a chilly reception. The inhabitants of this single-street hamlet on the National Road loved the Union, and the ragged Confederates who marched west through here epitomized what the citizens regarded as a rebellion. Confronted by openly defiant residents, the Confederates considered Middletown the most Union of all places they saw during their first trek to Maryland. When part of Gen. George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac marched through town a few days later, the citizens were more welcoming.

Following the Battle of South Mountain on September 14, Middletown's churches and dwellings became hospitals for Union casualties. Future President of the United States Rutherford B. Hayes, then a lieutenant colonel of the 23rd Ohio Infantry, was wounded at Fox's Gap. His wife, Lucy, nursed him back to health at Jacob Rudy's home at 504 West Main Street.

As Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson rode through Middletown on September 10, two very pretty girls with ribbons of red, white, and blue in their hair and small Union flags in their hands ran out to the curbstone, and laughingly waved their colors defiantly in the face of the General. He bowed and lifted his cap with
Markers in front of The Lamar House image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 2, 2006
2. Markers in front of The Lamar House
This marker, and two others, facing the sidewalk in front of the Lamar House, once a turn-of-the-19th-century rural medical sanitarium. It is now headquarters for The Central Maryland Heritage League.
a quite smile and said to his staff, “We evidently have no friends in this town.”
–Henry Kyd Douglas, I Rode with Stonewall
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 26.63′ N, 77° 32.879′ W. Marker is in Middletown, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of West Main Street (Alternate U.S. 40) and Elm Street, on the left when traveling west on West Main Street. Click for map. Located in front of the Central Maryland Heritage League Building. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 West Main Street, Middletown MD 21769, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Middletown (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Middletown (here, next to this marker); Appleman's Tannery (a few steps from this marker); Middletown in the Civil War (within shouting distance of this marker); Joshua Beckwith House (within shouting distance of this marker); 301 West Main Street
Middletown Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 24, 2009
3. Middletown Marker
Markers located on right
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); In Commemoration (about 400 feet away); 29 West Main Street (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Middletown.
 
More about this marker. The center of the marker displays a drawing of Union troops marching through Middletown on the National Road. A portrait of Gen. Jackson is on the right in the sidebar.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Rudy House (504 West Main Street) image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2007
4. Rudy House (504 West Main Street)
Here President Rutherford B. Hayes was nursed back to health after being wounded at Fox's Gap in the Battle of South Mountain, September 14, 1862.
Zion Lutheran Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2007
5. Zion Lutheran Church
The church was used as a hospital after the battles of South Mountain and Antietam.
Crouse House (204 West Main Street) image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2007
6. Crouse House (204 West Main Street)
When the Confederates first arrived in town on September 10, 1862, Nancy Crouse had a large U.S. flag flying from the second floor balcony. Confederate cavalrymen entered the house to remove the flag, but found Mrs. Crouse had wrapped herself in the flag and proclaimed, "You may shoot me, but never will I willingly give up my country's flag into the hands of traitors." Although she would lose the flag after a fight, it was later returned to her when captured at Antietam.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,601 times since then and 46 times this year. Last updated on , by Sarah Hovde of Rocky Ridge, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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