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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lexington in Lexington County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Daniel Koon House

 
 
Daniel Koon House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, August 22, 2009
1. Daniel Koon House Marker
Inscription.
This c. 1810 cottage was built on Bear Creek southeast of present Chapin by the family of Daniel Koon (1810-1876) who, with a secession of three wives, fathered 14 children. Self-taught, he spoke four languages and was well-known for his talent in "using," a folk practice of faith-healing brought to the Dutch Fork by German settlers and widely practiced here until modern times.

 
Location. 33° 59.217′ N, 81° 14.433′ W. Marker is in Lexington, South Carolina, in Lexington County. Marker is on Fox Street south of Columbia Avenue. Click for map. Building is on the grounds of the Lexington County Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 231 Fox Street, Lexington SC 29072, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Laurence Corley House (within shouting distance of this marker); Hazelius House (within shouting distance of this marker); Oak Grove Schoolhouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Post Office (within shouting distance of this marker); John Fox House (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named John Fox House
Daniel Koon House image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, August 22, 2009
2. Daniel Koon House
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Kitchen (about 400 feet away); Cotton Gin (about 400 feet away); Tomb of Dr. E.L. Hazelius (approx. 0.3 miles away); St. Stephen's Church (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Lexington.
 
Also see . . .  Lexington County Museum. The Lexington County Museum, founded in 1970, offers a rare and unforgettable experience – the chance to see and touch a way of life gone forever. (Submitted on August 28, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. James Daniel Koon's Three Wives
James Daniel Koon born 11 August 1810 died June 1871 married 1) Eve Margaret Eargle born 28 November 1810 died 2 June 1838; married 2) Eve Margaret (Peggy) Eargle born 3 February 1816 and married 3) Annie Melvina Eargle born 24 July 1839 died 22 April 1907. First wife buried Koon Family Cemetery, now destroyed. Third wife buried at Bethcar Baptist Church, between Wagner and New Holland, SC. (Source: http://dutchforkchapter.org/html/koon.html.)
Daniel Koon House and Chimney image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, August 22, 2009
3. Daniel Koon House and Chimney
    — Submitted August 28, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Daniel Koon and "Using"
The Dutch Germans who settled "in the fork" were often intelligent, well-read and hardworking. One example was Daniel Koon of the Chapin area who was born in 1810 and died in 1876.

Daniel was well read and had a library of books. He taught children to fear his books in order to protect them from handling. He could speak four languages.

He was also an expert craftsman and wheelwright, but his greatest reputation lay in his strange talents of being able to stop bleeding, soothing burns, curing thrash and talking children into deep, restful sleep. He admitted to being a "faith healer" but insisted he was no doctor nor did he pretend to have any special powers. Nevertheless, when neighbors sent for him night or day he hurried to them. He said he could soothe the ill by reassurance. He never refused sharing his talents nor did he ever charge for his services.

He had a widespread reputation for mystery and may have contributed to this image by clever manipulation. When Sherman troop's came to the Koon house at the end of the Civil War, they went to his barn to take his two mules and a horse. As they opened the gate, the animals burst free, knocking the soldiers out of the way and disappearing
Daniel Koon House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
4. Daniel Koon House and Marker
into the woods. The soldiers ransacked Koon's smokehouse and when his dog's began growling at them the soldiers shot at the dogs. They missed each time and the dogs escaped. Koon went to a wash pot, reached down into it and came up with a handful of pistol balls. He told the soldiers their bullets had gone to the wash pot. The frustrated soldiers hurriedly grouped and departed promptly taking no other belongings. The horse and mules came home two weeks later. (Source: From Lake Murray: Legend and Leisure 2nd Edition by Coy Bayne.)
    — Submitted August 28, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,124 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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