Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Georgetown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Holy Trinity Parish

1790

 
 
Holy Trinity Parrish Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 23, 2009
1. Holy Trinity Parrish Marker
Inscription.

Founded by the Jesuit community of George-town College.

This church was first dedicated 15 June 1851
Restored and re-dedicated 23 September 1979

The original church to the rear was dedicated 1792 and remains the oldest standing church in the District of Columbia.

 
Erected 1979 by Holy Trinity Church.
 
Location. 38° 54.426′ N, 77° 4.213′ W. Marker is in Georgetown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on 36th Street north of N Street, NW, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1315 36th Street, NW, Washington DC 20057, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Fitzgerald Kennedy (a few steps from this marker); Holy Trinity Church (within shouting distance of this marker); America's Oldest Catholic University (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Restoration of Georgetown’s Call Boxes (about 400 feet away); Hollywood on the Potomac (about 500 feet away); Prospect House (about 500 feet away); The Exorcist Steps (about 500 feet away); John Carroll (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Georgetown.
 
Also see . . .
Holy Trinity Parrish image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 23, 2009
2. Holy Trinity Parrish
Marker is on the fence, south of the church entrance in the shadows, lower right.

1. Holy Trinity Parish. (PDF) HABS Data Sheet, Library of Congress (Submitted on September 4, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

2. Parish History. (Submitted on September 4, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.)
 
Additional comments.
1. During the Civil War
"Present Church - Holy Trinity Church was one of the seven buildings in Georgetown that were converted into hospitals during the Civil War. Military guards, under the command of Captain Strong of Pennsylvania, were put in charge of the entire church property. Temporary flooring was built over the pews and sanctuary. (During the Army occupation the old church on First (N) Street was used for worshipers.) The church was restored to its original condition after the war, and received compensation from the government for its use and for repairs." -- HABS
    — Submitted September 4, 2016, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.

 
Additional keywords. Roman Catholic
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Notable Buildings
 
Plaque from the Historic American Buildings Survey with the John F. Kennedy memorial marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 23, 2009
3. Plaque from the Historic American Buildings Survey with the John F. Kennedy memorial marker
on fence, north of church entrance.
Holy Trinity Parish Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 3, 2016
4. Holy Trinity Parish Marker
Stained Glass Window, The Trinity image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 3, 2016
5. Stained Glass Window, The Trinity
Pater non est Spiritus Sanctu non est Filius non est Pater

Pater est Deus, Spiritus Santus est Deus, Filius est Deus
HABS Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 3, 2016
6. HABS Plaque
This Structure has been
Recorded by the
Historical American
Building Survey

of the United States Department
of the Interior for its archives
at the Library of Congress
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 810 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4, 5. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on September 9, 2016.
Paid Advertisement