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Leesburg in Loudoun County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Divided America, A Divided Loudoun County

 
 
A Divided America, A Divided Loudoun County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 1, 2007
1. A Divided America, A Divided Loudoun County Marker
Placed in August 2007.
Inscription. On April 12, 1861, with the firing on Fort Sumter, America went to war with itself. Just as the country was divided, so were Virginia and Loudoun County. The western portion of Virginia became the separate state of West Virginia in 1863. Here in Loudoun County, the division was based largely on the original settlement patterns, with the northwestern part of the county in opposition to the secessionist majority.

The Potomac River formed a dividing line and to most Southerners, Maryland was enemy held territory. The Union army gathered along the river, centered on Washington, D.C., with the Confederates some 25 miles away along Bull Run near the railroad hub known as Manassas Junction. There, on July 21, the war's first large land battle was fought. With the resulting Confederate victory, the Union Army pulled back to reorganize. During the late summer and fall, the stage was being set for other battles. On October 21, fighting broke out here at Ballís Bluff.
 
Erected by Ballís Bluff Regional Park/Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority.
 
Location. 39° 7.827′ N, 77° 31.847′ W. Marker is in Leesburg, Virginia, in Loudoun County. Marker can be reached from Ballís Bluff Road, on the left when traveling east
The Old Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 30, 2007
2. The Old Marker
. Click for map. Located next to the parking lot for Ballís Bluff Regional Park. Marker is in this post office area: Leesburg VA 20176, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Aftermath of Ballís Bluff (here, next to this marker); Battle of Balls Bluff (here, next to this marker); Additional Area Civil War Sites (here, next to this marker); The Battle at Ballís Bluff (within shouting distance of this marker); 8th Virginia Infantry (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); 8th Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment (about 500 feet away); 17th Mississippi Infantry (about 600 feet away); Battlefield Historic Restoration Project (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Leesburg.
 
More about this marker. The marker has a county map depicting the division between areas of Union and Confederate sentiments.

A newspaper drawing shows, “The housetops in Charleston during the bombardment of Sumter” from Harperís Weekly, May 4, 1861.
 
Regarding A Divided America, A Divided Loudoun County. Related Markers Note:This marker is one of a set along the Balls Bluff Battlefield walking trail. See the Balls Bluff Virtual Tour by Markers
Close Up View of the Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 30, 2007
3. Close Up View of the Map
link below for details on each stop.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Balls Bluff. A brief overview. (Submitted on August 29, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Official Reports. Written by the officers who led units in the battle. (Submitted on August 29, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. A County Divided. Loudoun County and the Civil War. (Submitted on August 29, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. Balls Bluff Battlefield Virtual Tour by Marker. Over twenty markers detail the action at Balls Bluff and related sites. Please use the Click to map all markers shown on this page option at the bottom of the page to view a map of the marker locations. The hybrid view offers an excellent overlook of the park. (Submitted on November 11, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Narrative from the Older Version of the Marker
On April 12, 1861, the storm clouds of war erupted over a divided America with the firing on Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. Just as America was divided in 1861, so was Virginia. Virginiaís western half would form a separate pro-Union state in 1863. Loudoun County was also split. Here in Loudoun County the division was based on settlement patterns.

In
Markers Adjacent to the Parking Lot image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 30, 2007
4. Markers Adjacent to the Parking Lot
the weeks following the loss of Fort Sumter, the Union Army formed around Washington, D.C. The Confederate Army gathered at Manassas Junction, Virginia, twenty-five miles south of Leesburg. On July 21, 1861, the first great land battle of the war was fought on the plains of Manassas along a creek known as Bull Run. The result was a great Confederate victory.

The Potomac River now formed the dividing line between the Union and the Confederacy. The stage was set for the Battle of Ballís Bluff.

Kim Holien — Narrative and graphics.
Robert Wells Jr. and The American Blue & Gray Association — financial support.
    — Submitted November 11, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,422 times since then. Last updated on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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