“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Heathsville in Northumberland County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)

John Heath

John Heath Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 30, 2009
1. John Heath Marker
Inscription. John Heath was born on 8 May 1758 in Northumberland County. He attended William & Mary College and on 5 Dec. 1776, he and four of his classmates founded Phi Beta Kappa, a prestigious undergraduate honors organization. He became its first president. Heath served in the Revolutionary War and practiced law here and in Richmond. He was Northumberland County’s commonwealth’s attorney (1781–1784, 1787–1793) and a member of the U.S. House of Representatives (1793–1797). Heath also served on the Council of State, that advised the governor, from 1803 to his death on 13 Oct. 1810 in Richmond.
Erected 2002 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number O-65.)
Location. 37° 55.257′ N, 76° 28.776′ W. Marker is in Heathsville, Virginia, in Northumberland County. Marker is on Northumberland Highway (U.S. 360) just west of Rowes Landing Road (County Route 601), on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1828 Northumberland Hwy, Heathsville VA 22473, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. St. Stephen’s Parish (approx. 0.3 miles away); Rice’s Hotel, Hughlett’s Tavern (approx.
John Heath Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 30, 2009
2. John Heath Marker
0.4 miles away); Northumberland Courthouse Square (approx. half a mile away); Northumberland County Confederate Monument (approx. half a mile away); British Raids on the Coan River (approx. 1.6 miles away); Coan Baptist Church (approx. 1.6 miles away); Northumberland House and Mantua (approx. 1.8 miles away); Northumberland Academy (approx. 2.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Heathsville.
Also see . . .  Phi Beta Kappa Society. Wikipedia entry. “The new society was intended to be ‘purely of domestic manufacture, without any connexion whatever with anything European, either English or German.’ The founders of Phi Beta Kappa declared that the society was formed for congeniality and to promote good fellowship, with ‘friendship as its basis and benevolence and literature as its pillars.’ Like these older, Latin-letter fraternities, the Phi Beta Kappa was a secret society. To protect its members and to instill a sense of solidarity, each had the essential attributes of most modern fraternities: an oath of secrecy, a badge (or token) and a diploma (or certificate) of membership, mottoes (in the case of the Phi Beta Kappa, in Greek rather than in Latin), a ritual of initiation, a handclasp of recognition; to these, the Phi Beta Kappa would soon add another attribute, branches or ‘chapters’ at other colleges. The society was given the motto, Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης or ‘Philosophy is the guide of life’. Greek was chosen as the language for the motto because Heath ‘was the best Greek scholar in college’.” (Submitted on September 18, 2009.) 
Categories. Fraternal or Sororal OrganizationsNotable Persons
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,709 times since then and 103 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement