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Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“The Great Chief Justice”

 
 
"The Great Chief Justice" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 20, 2009
1. "The Great Chief Justice" Marker
Inscription. Born in Fauquier County, John Marshall was admitted to the bar there in 1780 following service in the Revolutionary army. In 1783 he married Mary Willis Ambler and lived the remainder of his life in Richmond where until 1797 he accepted President Adamís request to help represent his nation in France. Marshall was deeply involved in state political and legal affairs. He served intermittently in the House of Delegates on the Council of State, the Richmond City Council, and after 1793 as brigadier general of the state militia. He played an active role in the Convention of June 1788 that ratified the U.S. Constitution. Revered by his fellow Richmonders, Marshall was active in most civic and social affairs and seldom missed a public gathering. Marshall and a handful of his contemporaries dominated the state bar, he practiced before state courts, the U.S. Circuit Court and the U.S Supreme Court, where he argued the famous case of Ware vs. Hylton in 1796. His advice was frequently sought by other attorneys. After his involvement in the XYZ Affair and his return from France in 1798, he was elected to Congress, but resigned in 1800 to become Secretary of State, a position he held when President Adams appointed him Chief Justice of the Unites States on January 20, 1801.

Marshall sat as chief justice until 1835, longer than any other
"The Great Chief Justice" Marker in Shockoe Hill Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 20, 2009
2. "The Great Chief Justice" Marker in Shockoe Hill Cemetery
person, and during his tenure he persuaded the justices to begin speaking as one voice. The court emerged as a strong, effective part of national government interpreting the Constitution and granting broad powers to Congress.

While serving as chief justice, Marshall remained a Richmonder. He fought for the completion of the James River canal, attended the state constitutional convention in 1829-1830, he was the first president of the Virginia Historical Society, and reared six children in his house on Shockoe Hill. Holding circuit court here in 1807, he presided over the treason trial of Aaron Burr. Marshall died in Philadelphia on July 6, 1835, an as he requested, was brought home for burial. He wrote his own epitaph: its humility is our best legacy of his character.

Text adapted from former VCU Bicentennial Committee sign.
 
Location. 37° 33.13′ N, 77° 25.895′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker can be reached from Hospital Street near North 4th Street. Click for map. This marker is located at the grave site of John Marshall in Shockoe Hill Cemetery. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond VA 23219, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Shockoe Hill Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Union POW Memorial
John and Mary Willis Ambler Marshall image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 20, 2009
3. John and Mary Willis Ambler Marshall
Two days before his death, Marshall enjoined his friends to place only a plain slab over his and his wife's graves, and he wrote the simple inscription himself:
John Marshall
Son of Thomas and Mary Marshall was born the 24th of September 1755. Intermarried with Mary Willis Ambler the 3rd of January 1783. Departed this life the 6th day of July 1835.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Brown's Island Disaster (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Shockoe Hill Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Shockoe Hill Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Hebrew Cemetery (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Engine Company No. 9 Fire Station (approx. 0.3 miles away); Saint Joseph Catholic Church (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Richmond.
 
Also see . . .
1. Friends of Shockoe Hill Cemetery. (Submitted on September 21, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
2. John Marshall Foundation. (Submitted on September 21, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
	Grave of John Marshall, Shockoe Hill Cemetery, North End of 3rd St., Richmond, Va. image. Click for full size.
By Southern Bargain House, Richmond, Va.
4. Grave of John Marshall, Shockoe Hill Cemetery, North End of 3rd St., Richmond, Va.
The limited area on this cemetery having been filled with graves, no interments have been made therein for several years. The grave of Chief Justice Marshall, side by side of that of his wife, is shown in this view. Marshall's modest and unassuming simplicity of character is evidenced by the inscription he directed for his tombstone, as follows: - 'John Marshall, son of Thomas and Mary Marshall, was born the 24th of Sept. 1755. Intermarried with Mary Willis Ambler the 3rd of January, 1783. Departed this life the 6th of July, 1835.' VCU Libraries Digital Collections - Rarely Seen Richmond
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 741 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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