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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Walterboro in Colleton County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Walterboro Army Air Field

 
 
Walterboro Army Air Field Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 13, 2009
1. Walterboro Army Air Field Marker
Inscription. "We were prisoners, but (we weren't made to) feel like prisoners. We were just people waiting to go back home"
- Helmut Ulbricht, German POW, Walterboro Army Air Field, 1945.The Press and Standard, 1994.
Two Hundred and fifty German prisoners of war were held at WAAF during WW II, providing essential labor for local farmers and repatriation at the end of the war.

Look closely.
Buildings are rising out of forgotten foundations in the surrounding woods.

Listen closely.
There is a distant drone of fighter planes as they sweep overhead. (Picture included): The 510th Fighter Squadron was just one of the many groups for whom Walterboro was the last training stop before being sent into combat overseas. Photograph courtesy of the 510th Fighter Squadron.

You can hear voices in the wind whispering through the pines... The crisp orders of officers. The boisterous tones of pilots and mechanics. The low tones of German prisoners.

Today this is a quiet regional airport. During World War II it was a bustling air field which thousands of men passed through on their way to action overseas. For many the air field and nearby town were the last taste they would have of home. For some it would be a battleground as fraught with emotion and challenges as the
right picture: The 510th Fighter Squadron image. Click for full size.
By Walterboro Army Air Field Marker
2. right picture: The 510th Fighter Squadron
skies above Europe. For others it was a prison.

Together, their stories bring to life the incredible history of Walterboro Army Air Field.

(Lower left picture): Over five hundred black pilots faced discrimination and segregation while training at Walterboro Army Air Field between April 1944 and October 1945. Tuskegee class 44F, 1944. Photograph courtesy of Hirem E. Mann
 
Location. 32° 54.998′ N, 80° 38.259′ W. Marker is in Walterboro, South Carolina, in Colleton County. Marker is on Aviation Way near Lt.Col. Hiram Mann Driveway, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located in the Airport Park off Rt US 17A, at the Walterboro Army Airfield Memorial Park. Marker is in this post office area: Walterboro SC 29488, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Prisoner Of War Camp and Camouflage School (here, next to this marker); The Tuskegee Airman of World War II (here, next to this marker); The Tuskegee Airmen (a few steps from this marker); Walterboro Army Airfield (a few steps from this marker); The Beacon (within shouting distance of this marker); Anderson Field / Walterboro Army Air Field
training at Walterboro Army Air Field between April 1944 and October 1945. image. Click for full size.
By Walterboro Army Air Field Marker
3. training at Walterboro Army Air Field between April 1944 and October 1945.
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Walterboro Army Airfield (within shouting distance of this marker); Bethel Presbyterian Church (approx. 1.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Walterboro.
 
Categories. War, World II
 
Walterboro Army Air Field Memorial Park image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 13, 2009
4. Walterboro Army Air Field Memorial Park
Tuskegee Airmen Monument at Walterboro Army Airfield Park image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 13, 2009
5. Tuskegee Airmen Monument at Walterboro Army Airfield Park
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 727 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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