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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Würzburg, Bavaria, Germany — Southern Germany (Scarplands and Alpine Region)
 

Old Cranes

Alter Kranen

 
 
The Old Cranes Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 27, 2009
1. The Old Cranes Marker
Inscription. In den Jahren 1767-1773 errichtete Fürstbischof Adam Friedrich von Seinsheim ein Hebewerk am Mainufer, das unter dem Namen “Alter Kranen” bekannt ist. Dieser Kran diente den Binnenschiffern bis 1846 zum entladen ihrer Schiffe. Der ausführende Architekt war Franz Ignaz Neumann, der Sohn des berühmten Barockmeisters Balthasar Neumann. Franz Ignaz Neumann hat mit diesem Bauwerk eine noch heute in der Fachwelt bestaunte Anlage geschaffen.

Translated, the marker reads: In the years 1767-1773, Prince-Bishop Adam Friedrich von Seinsheim built on the banks of the Main River a lifting facility, which is known by the name "Old Cranes". This crane was used by barge operators to unload ships until 1846. The executive architect was Franz Ignaz Neumann, the son of the famous Baroque master Johann Balthasar Neumann. With this structure Franz Ignaz Neumann created an engineering marvel which is still admired today.

 
Location. 49° 47.767′ N, 9° 55.555′ E. Marker is in Würzburg, Bavaria. Marker is at the intersection of Kranenkai and Gerberstrasse, on the right when traveling south on Kranenkai. Click for map. The Old Cranes are located on the river bank, roughly 150 feet west of where Gerberstrasse runs into Kranenkai/Mainkai. Marker
The Old Cranes Marker- Wide Shot image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 27, 2009
2. The Old Cranes Marker- Wide Shot
is in this post office area: Würzburg, Bavaria 97070, Germany.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within 5 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Lower Main Mill (approx. 0.3 kilometers away); Faulenberg Barracks (approx. 3.8 kilometers away).
 
More about this marker. The marker is located on the north side of the crane structure, below street level (take the stairs down from the street to the quay level).
 
Also see . . .  Alter Kranen (Würzburg). Wikipedia.org's German language article on the history of the Old Crane. (Submitted on September 24, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
High Water Marks by the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 27, 2009
3. High Water Marks by the Marker
Engraved in the stones below the marker are several highwater marks and dates: February 7, 1909; January 16, (19)20; and February 25, 1970. This location is the oldest flow measuring station on the Main River, with measurements dating back to October 1823. Although not so engraved, records indicate flood levels in 1342, 1784, and 1845 that were even higher than the 1909 level.
Old Cranes - Looking North image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 27, 2009
4. Old Cranes - Looking North
The crane mechanism is simple chain, pulley, and hook system within a double treadmill, supported by copper clad oaken beams. Two men could lift loads up to two tons, with another 2-4 men necessary to rotate the structure, overseen by a crane master.
Wuerzburg - Looking South Along the Main River (early 1800's) image. Click for full size.
Artist Unknown, Copy of Engraving Courtesy of Wikipedia.org
5. Wuerzburg - Looking South Along the Main River (early 1800's)
Looking south along the Main River, Old Cranes is visible on the left, the Alte Mainbrücke (Old Main Bridge) in the center, and the Marienberg Fortress on the bluff on the right.
Old Cranes as seen from the <i>Alte Mainbrücke</i> (Old Main Bridge) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, August 27, 2009
6. Old Cranes as seen from the Alte Mainbrücke (Old Main Bridge)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 1,759 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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