HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
            “Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
  Home  — My Markers  — Add A Marker  — Marker Series  — Links & Books  — Forum  — About Us
Atlantic Highlands in Monmouth County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
Highest Point on the Atlantic Seaboard
Mount Mitchill

Coastal Habitats
 
Highest Point on the Atlantic Seaboard Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, September 20, 2009
1. Highest Point on the Atlantic Seaboard Marker
 
Inscription. Mount Mitchill, at an elevation of 266 feet above sea level, is the highest natural point on the Atlantic Seaboard between southern Maine and the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. Cartographers (map makers) named the prominence, located in the southwest corner of the park, in honor of Dr. Samuel Latham Mitchill (1764-1831), a New York physician, naturalist, educator, and U. S. Congressman. Mitchill was part of an 1816 expedition to measure the height of the Navesink Highlands.

Mount Mitchill and the surrounding highlands are prone to slumping or slump blocking. When this geological phenomenon occurs, large blocks of earth, typically sandy soil covered by an erosion-resistant capstone layer of ironstone, slide suddenly down a cliff face.
 
Erected by National Park Service, State of New Jersey.
 
Location. 40° 24.481′ N, 74° 0.302′ W. Marker is in Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey, in Monmouth County. Marker is on Ocean Blvd, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is located at the Mount Mitchill Scenic Overlook. Marker is at or near this postal address: 460 Ocean Boulevard, Atlantic Highlands NJ 07716, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies
 
Marker in Atlantic Highlands Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, September 20, 2009
2. Marker in Atlantic Highlands
The marker is part of the New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail Route.
 
. Friends of Monmouth County 9/11 Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Raritan Bay & New York Harbor (within shouting distance of this marker); Longshore Sediment Movement (within shouting distance of this marker); The Hartshorne Legacy (approx. 0.6 miles away); Captain Joshua Huddy — Prisoner of War (approx. 0.6 miles away); Henry Hudson Springs (approx. 0.8 miles away); British Campsite (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named British Campsite (approx. 1.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Atlantic Highlands.
 
More about this marker. The bottom left of the marker contains a picture of the slope of Mount Mitchill with the caption “The view areas at the Mount Mitchill Scenic Overlook have been designed to minimize the amount of disturbance on the slope. Mature trees have been planted to stabilize the soil with their root systems and to shade and nurture the understory which covers this fragile slope.” The right side of the marker features a series of three pictures showing the profile of Mount Mitchill at various points in time. The first depicts a “Section of Slope Before Slumping.” The second shows the “Primary Slump Block Sheared from Face of Slope – circa 1782.” The last picture displays the “Secondary Slump Block Sheared from Primary Slump Block.”
 
View from Mount Mitchill Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, September 20, 2009
3. View from Mount Mitchill
Sandy Hook and New York City can be seen in this photo taken from the marker.
 

 
Also see . . .
1. Mount Mitchill Scenic Overlook. Monmouth County Park System website. (Submitted on September 24, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail Route. National Park Service website. (Submitted on September 24, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
9/11 Memorial Sculpture Photo, Click for full size
By Bill Coughlin, September 20, 2009
4. 9/11 Memorial Sculpture
This monument honors the 147 Monmouth county residents who lost their lives in the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001. The marker can be seen in the background, to the left of the eagle.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on September 24, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,399 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 24, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
 
Recommend or Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr


•••
More Search Options
 
Markers
Near You

 
Categories

 
States & Provinces

 
Counties
Click to List


 
Countries

Page composed
in 635 ms.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To search within this page, hold down the Ctrl key and press F.
On an Apple computer,
hold down the Apple key and press F.