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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond in Fort Bend County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Morton Cemetery

 
 
Morton Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 19, 2009
1. Morton Cemetery Marker
Inscription. Burial place of illustrious pioneers, including 1838-1841 Republic of Texas President Mirabeau B. Lamar (1798-1859) and one of State's first women settlers, Jane Long (1798-1880), known as "The Mother of Texas."

On Labor No. 1 of Mexican land grant to William Morton, 1822 settler in advance party of Austin's "Old 300" colonists; founded 1825 when Morton buried Robert Gelaspie (Gillespie), a brother Mason who had met with foul play. Later he erected a handmade brick tomb, the first known Masonic landmark in Texas.

In an 1833 Brazos flood, Morton himself met death and his body was lost. His widow Nancy inherited Labor No. 1 and sold it to Handy & Lusk, promoters of the Richmond townsite. In 1854 the parcel of land encompassing the cemetery was acquired by Michael DeChaumes. In the 1890s Morton Lodge No. 72, A. F. & A. M., gained possession of "DeChaumes Cemetery" and operated it as Richmond Masonic Cemetery until the early 1940s. It was then turned over to the newly-formed Richmond Cemetery Association, which later was retitled Morton Cemetery Association, probably to have its name conform to "Morton Cemetery" -- the name in use ever since the era of Lodge ownership.

The cemetery has become a memorial to its founder.
 
Erected 1972 by State Historical Survey Committee
Entrance to Morton Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 19, 2009
2. Entrance to Morton Cemetery
Historical marker is visible on right, by the flag
. (Marker Number 9012.)
 
Location. 29° 35.187′ N, 95° 45.761′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Texas, in Fort Bend County. Marker can be reached from Commerce Road. Click for map. Marker is located at the Horton Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 410 Commerce Road, Richmond TX 77469, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Site of Fort Bend (approx. 0.4 miles away); Site of the Home of Randal Jones (approx. 0.4 miles away); Site of the Home of Mirabeau B. Lamar (approx. one mile away); Dismounted Texas Cavalry (approx. 1.3 miles away); First Baptist Church of Rosenberg (approx. 3.4 miles away); Texas Prison System Central State Farm Main Building (approx. 6.3 miles away); Hodge's Bend Cemetery (approx. 7.1 miles away); Sugar Land Refinery (approx. 8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Richmond.
 
Additional keywords. Santa Anna, Battle of San Jacinto
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesFraternal or Sororal OrganizationsSettlements & SettlersWar, Texas Independence
 
Cemetery map image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 19, 2009
3. Cemetery map
Grave of Republic of Texas President Mirabeau B. Lamar image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 19, 2009
4. Grave of Republic of Texas President Mirabeau B. Lamar
Grave of Jane Long, known as "The Mother of Texas" image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 19, 2009
5. Grave of Jane Long, known as "The Mother of Texas"
Brick tomb and monument, first known Masonic landmark in Texas image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 19, 2009
6. Brick tomb and monument, first known Masonic landmark in Texas
Erected by William Morton to honor Robert Gillespie, a brother Mason who had met with foul play.
Historical marker associated with Masonic marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 19, 2009
7. Historical marker associated with Masonic marker
The marker states that Santa Anna's army camped here enroute to the Battle of San Jacinto. Several Mexican soldiers attempted to destroy the monument, but were stopped by one of their officers who was also a Mason.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 4,723 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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