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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Summerville in Dorchester County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Fort Dorchester

 
 
Fort Dorchester Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 13, 2009
1. Fort Dorchester Marker
Inscription. A brick powder magazine enclosed by a tabby wall eight feet high was built here in 1757. During the Revolution, Dorchester was a strategic point. In 1775 the magazine was fortified and the garrison commanded by Capt. Francis Marion. British troops occupied the town in April 1780. They were driven out by cavalry and infantry under Col. Wade Hampton and Gen. Nathanael Greene on December 1, 1781.
 
Erected 1963 by S.C. State Commission of Forestry, Division of State Parks. (Marker Number 18-3.)
 
Location. 32° 56.853′ N, 80° 10.206′ W. Marker is in Summerville, South Carolina, in Dorchester County. Marker can be reached from State Park Road. Click for map. Located in Old Dorchester Historic Site, .6 miles south of Dorchester Road ( State Road 642 ). Marker is in this post office area: Summerville SC 29485, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Colonial Dorchester (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Colonial Dorchester (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Colonial Dorchester (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named
Fort Dorchester Marker, with "Tabby" Fort ruins image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 13, 2009
2. Fort Dorchester Marker, with "Tabby" Fort ruins
Colonial Dorchester (about 300 feet away); Linking Places and People (about 300 feet away); Dorchester Free School (about 500 feet away); The Bell Tower of St. George's (about 500 feet away); Parish Church of St. George, Dorchester (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Summerville.
 
Regarding Fort Dorchester. The town gradually declined after the Revolution. It was abandoned by 1788. Listed in the National Register December 2, 1969, Site - #69000165 Historic Significance: Information Potential
Area of Significance: Religion, Social History, Historic - Non-Aboriginal, Military, Politics/Government, Commerce
Cultural Affiliation: American Revolution, Early American Village
Period of Significance: 1650-1699, 1700-1749, 1750-1799
Owner: State
Historic Function: Domestic
Historic Sub-function: Village Site
Current Function: Landscape
Current Sub-function: Park
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Fort Dorchester Marker, located at the west end of the parking lot image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 13, 2009
3. Fort Dorchester Marker, located at the west end of the parking lot
Fort Dorchester as seen today image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 13, 2009
4. Fort Dorchester as seen today
Fort Dorchester , site of the powder magazine image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 13, 2009
5. Fort Dorchester , site of the powder magazine
Fort Dorchester . one time powder magazine image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 13, 2009
6. Fort Dorchester . one time powder magazine
Fort Dorchester ruins, as seen today image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 13, 2009
7. Fort Dorchester ruins, as seen today
Fort Dorchester, as seen from the road leading from the Ashley River image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 13, 2009
8. Fort Dorchester, as seen from the road leading from the Ashley River
Ft. Dorchester-Archaeological Dig image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History, circa 1970
9. Ft. Dorchester-Archaeological Dig
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,103 times since then and 101 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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