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Lacey Spring in Rockingham County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
Lacey Spring
West Point Classmates at Odds

ó 1864 Valley Campaigns ó
 
Lacey Spring CWT Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, October 3, 2009
1. Lacey Spring CWT Marker
 
Inscription. On the early morning hours of December 21, 1864, part of Union Gen. George A. Custerís cavalry division was eating breakfast here and preparing to advance when it suddenly came under attack. Custer had bivouacked the night before not expecting any interference from Confederate Gen. Thomas L. Rosserís smaller cavalry division nearby. After a brief and spirited skirmish, Custer elected to withdraw north and abort his mission to march to Staunton and support a larger cavalry operation on both sides of Massanutten Mountain. Custer lost forty men captured, along with a few horses and camp equipment. Lacey Spring was one of many smaller actions that followed Gen. Philip H. Sheridanís crushing defeats of Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early in September and October.

Custer and Rosser were friends and members of the class of 1861 at the United States Military Academy at West Point. Hundreds of former cadets and classmates served on each side during the war. The nature of academy life often forged close bonds among cadets, and many friendships survived the war. Rosser resigned from West Point in May 1861 before graduation, so he never received a class ranking. Custer, on the other hand, was the “goat” of the class, finishing last. Like many cadets, they studied each other's strengths and weaknesses while at the academy, and during
 
Map of Lacey Spring Action. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, October 3, 2009
2. Map of Lacey Spring Action.
 
the war this knowledge served them in combat. Though they fought fiercely against each other, many West Pointers remained “friendly enemies” during the war and afterward.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Location. 38° 32.503′ N, 78° 46.267′ W. Marker is in Lacey Spring, Virginia, in Rockingham County. Marker can be reached from North Valley Pike (U.S. 11) 0.2 miles south of Lacey Spring Road. Click for map. This marker is located in the parking lot of Lacey Spring Elementary School. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8621 North Valley Pike, Lacey Spring VA 22833, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, as the crow flies. Cavalry Engagement (approx. ľ mile away); Abraham Lincolnís Father (approx. 0.3 miles away); Long's Chapel and Zenda (approx. 2 miles away); Lincoln's Virginia Ancestors (approx. 3.6 miles away); Dr. Jessee Bennett (approx. 5.1 miles away); Breneman-Turner Mill (approx. 5.8 miles away); Elder John Kline Monument (approx. 6.6 miles away); Catherine Furnace (approx. 7.4 miles away).
 
More about this marker. On the lower left are portraits of "Union Gen. George A. Custer" and "CSA Gen. Thomas Rosser".
 
Also see . . .
 
Lacey Spring Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, October 3, 2009
3. Lacey Spring Marker
 

1. Shenandoah at War - Rockingham. (Submitted on October 4, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
2. Civil War Traveler - New Market Area - Lacey Spring. Virginia Valley & Mountains - Route 11: Winchester to Port Republic. (Submitted on October 4, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Massanutten Mountains to the east. Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, October 3, 2009
4. Massanutten Mountains to the east.
 
 
Lacey Spring Cemetery (facing northeast). Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, October 4, 2009
5. Lacey Spring Cemetery (facing northeast).
Direction of Confederate attack.
 
 
Valley Pike (facing south). Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, October 4, 2009
6. Valley Pike (facing south).
Area of the Union cavalry encampment.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on October 4, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,115 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 4, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
 
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