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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Augusta in Richmond County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

White HouseTract

 
 
White HouseTract Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 16, 2005
1. White HouseTract Marker
Inscription. The 500-acres parcel of land long known as the “White House Tract” witnessed many of Augusta’s most significant historical events. On this tract an Indian trading company known as MacKay’s Trading Post, or the White House, flourished. Around this establishment the bitter 1st Siege of Augusta raged for four days in September 1780. The unsuccessful Patriots under Col. Elijah Clarke had to leave some wounded behind. Some of these had broken their paroles and were executed by Col. Thomas Brown.

The White House Tract was divided into lots and became the town of Harrisburg which was eventually absorbed by Augusta. On the northern end of the tract near where the White House stood, the first Augusta Arsenal was built in 1819, and the Augusta Canal was built across it in 1843. This canal provided power for three textile mills and the Confederate Powder Works built on the White House Tract.

One of the most lasting of monuments built on the tract is the Harris-Pearson-Walker House, c. 1797, which was restored in the 1950’s
 
Erected 1978 by Georgia Department of Natural Resources. (Marker Number 121-48.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location.
White HouseTract (Ezekiel Harris House Museum),and Marker, seen at the parking lot image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 7, 2011
2. White HouseTract (Ezekiel Harris House Museum),and Marker, seen at the parking lot
33° 29.069′ N, 81° 59.653′ W. Marker is in Augusta, Georgia, in Richmond County. Marker is on Welch Lane 0.1 miles east of Eve Street, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. The marker stands at the edge of the parking lot for the Ezekiel Harris House Museum, which faces Broad Street (1822 Broad Street). The parking lot is reached off Welch Lane, which runs behind the house. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1822 Broad Street, Augusta GA 30904, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Augusta Canal (approx. 0.2 miles away); Confederate Obelisk-Chimney (approx. 0.2 miles away); Explosion At The Confederate Powder Works (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Confederate States Powder Works (approx. 0.2 miles away); Confederate Powder Works (approx. ¼ mile away); Archibald Willingham Butt Memorial Bridge (approx. 0.7 miles away); Dennis Cahill (approx. 0.7 miles away); a different marker also named The Augusta Canal (approx. 0.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Augusta.
 
Regarding White HouseTract. For many years the Ezekiel Harris house was throught to be the White House, where 13 wounded American patriots were hanged by the British in 1780. Later research proved that the White House no longer stands, and that the Harris house was built after
White House (Ezekiel Harris House), seen along Broad Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 7, 2011
3. White House (Ezekiel Harris House), seen along Broad Street
the Revolutionary War.
 
Also see . . .  Ezekiel Harris House. Information on the Ezekiel Harris House Musuem. (Submitted on October 14, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraIndustry & CommerceWar, US CivilWar, US RevolutionaryWaterways & Vessels
 
White House, rear view image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, August 7, 2011
4. White House, rear view
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 885 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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