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Ridgefield in Fairfield County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Ridgefield

 
 
Ridgefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 17, 2009
1. Ridgefield Marker
Inscription. This town was founded in 1708 by a group of families from Norwalk who purchased twenty thousand acres from the Ramapoo Indians for one hundred pounds sterling. They were aided by John Copp, a surveyor, who explored the land now lying between High Ridge and East Ridge and recommended it as a promising agricultural area, suitable for settlement. In 1777 at the Battle of Ridgefield, Colonial militia fought British and Hessian troops returning from a raid on American military stores in Danbury. They were headed back to Compo Beach on the shore of Long Island Sound. Ridgefield began as a farming community and remained a typical New England village until after the Civil War. Then it became a summer resort town for prosperous New York City families and many large homes were erected over the years on Main Street, West Lane, High Ridge, Peaceable Street, and East Ridge.

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Since railroad lines had avoided Ridgefield because of its altitude, it remained more rural than other towns near New York City. Businessmen of the town, however, were able to promote and secure the construction of a spur line from Branchville in 1870 to make this community more easily accessible. The families from New York hired Italian and Irish immigrants who built village utilities and became estate managers and gardeners. The descendants of
Ridgefield Marker (Reverse Side) image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 17, 2009
2. Ridgefield Marker (Reverse Side)
many of these workers attained status in business and civic affairs of the town as time went on. Native sons of Ridgefield who achieved eminence include Phineas C. Lounsbury, Governor of Connecticut 1887-1889, and Cyrus Northrup, President of the University of Minnesota from 1884 to 1911. The expansion of suburban New York began to reach Ridgefield in the 1950ís and continues to this time. Despite this, much of the town retains its true small-town New England flavor.
 
Erected 1980 by Town of Ridgefield, The Ridgefield Preservation Trust and the Connecticut Historical Commission.
 
Location. 41° 17.011′ N, 73° 29.907′ W. Marker is in Ridgefield, Connecticut, in Fairfield County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and Prospect Street, on the right when traveling north on Main Street. Click for map. Marker is located in front of the Ridgefield Library. Marker is in this post office area: Ridgefield CT 06877, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Smith Tavern – A Colonial Meeting Place (a few steps from this marker); Ballard Park (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of Ridgefield (within shouting distance of this marker); Main Street in the Late 1800s
Marker at Ridgefield Library image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 17, 2009
3. Marker at Ridgefield Library
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Village in the 1900s (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Ridgefield Train Station (about 600 feet away); The Elms Inn and Stebbins Homestead (about 600 feet away); Bailey Avenue: A Short-Cut to the Train Station (about 700 feet away but has been reported missing). Click for a list of all markers in Ridgefield.
 
Categories. Political SubdivisionsSettlements & Settlers
 
Main Street Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 17, 2009
4. Main Street Marker
Ridgefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 17, 2009
5. Ridgefield Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 990 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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