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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Georgetown in Clay County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

New Lowell United Methodist Church / New Lowell School

 
 
New Lowell United Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 14, 2011
1. New Lowell United Methodist Church Marker
Side 1
Inscription.
New Lowell United Methodist Church
Methodist Episcopal Church worship services were conducted in this area during the early 1840ís in a brush arbor. The original church, known as Lowell, was destroyed by fire during the Civil War. From 1865 to 1890 the Methodists and Baptists worshiped together at Union Church at Midway and later at Salem Church. The present church was built in 1900 from virgin pine and the interior still contains the original pews, pulpit and altar rail. On January 9, 1901 the church was deeded as a place of worship by W. T. Credille. The trustees were E. A. Standley, E. D. Griffin and J. A. Wash. The church became a charge of the Fort Gaines Circuit July 22, 1903.

New Lowell School
This area was settled about 1820 along the falls of Pataula Creek in a community known as Lowell. The falls provided water power for several commercial enterprises including a saw mill, cotton gin and grist mill. The community was later known as Garfield. Grades one through ten attended the school in the school house which was built circa 1890. Classes were for 10-25 children who performed housekeeping and janitorial duties as well as school work. The last class was held in 1921. The schoolhouse was also used as a center for social functions and as a place of worship. About 1900
New Lowell School Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 14, 2011
2. New Lowell School Marker
Side 2
the community became known as Gilbert and later as Credilleís Mill.
 
Erected 1986 by Historic Chattahoochee Commission and the New Lowell United Methodist Church.
 
Location. 31° 43.812′ N, 85° 5.508′ W. Marker is near Georgetown, Georgia, in Clay County. Marker is on New Hope Church Road (County Route 129) 2.6 miles west of Georgia Route 39, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. The marker is reached by following County Road 129 as it deteriorates to the end of the road and the small community. Marker is in this post office area: Georgetown GA 39854, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Toney-Standley House (approx. one mile away but has been reported missing); Indian Treaty Boundary Line (approx. 4.3 miles away in Alabama); a different marker also named Indian Treaty Boundary Line (approx. 5.5 miles away in Alabama); Mt. Gilead Baptist Church (approx. 6.1 miles away); White Oak United Methodist Church (approx. 6.1 miles away in Alabama); 1814 Boundary / Founding of Fort Gaines (approx. 7.2 miles away); Oketeyeconne / Chattahoochee Theater (approx. 7.2 miles away); Liberty United Methodist Church / Hilliardsville (approx. 7.3 miles away in Alabama).
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USCemeteries & Burial SitesChurches, Etc.EducationSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
New Lowell United Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 14, 2011
3. New Lowell United Methodist Church Marker
New Lowell School Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 14, 2011
4. New Lowell School Marker
New Lowell United Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 15, 2011
5. New Lowell United Methodist Church Marker
The church is the building on the left.
New Lowell School Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 14, 2011
6. New Lowell School Marker
Looking west on County Road 129 toward the Walter F. George Reservoir
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,352 times since then and 57 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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