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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Kinston in Lenoir County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Battle of Wyse Fork

Last Mass Capture of Union Troops

 

—Carolinas Campaign —

 
Battle of Wyse Fork Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., October 20, 2009
1. Battle of Wyse Fork Marker
Inscription. The yellow sidebar in the upper left of the marker provides a brief synopsis of the Carolinas Campaign. It states:
The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy’s logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s last-ditch attack at Bentonville. After Sherman was reinforced at Goldsboro late in March, Johnston saw the futility of further resistance and surrendered on April 26, essentially ending the Civil War.

Early in March 1865, Union Gen. John M. Schofield began moving from New Bern to Goldsboro, a vital rail junction. His mission was to open railroad communications between the two cities and accumulate supplies for Gen. William T. Sherman, who was marching north to Goldsboro. Schofield ordered Gen. Jacob D. Cox to lead the way. Along Southwest Creek near Kinston, Confederate Gen. Robert F. Hoke’s division blocked Cox’s route.

The Federals entrenched here after dark on March 7, facing west toward the position on the western bank of Southwest Creek occupied by
Map of the Battle of Wyse Fork, from the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., October 20, 2009
2. Map of the Battle of Wyse Fork, from the Marker
the Confederates. Dover Road crossed Southwest Creek here at Jackson’s Mill Pond, and the Confederates had constructed a series of trenches on the west bank to protect the approaches to Kinston.

On the morning of March 8, Hoke assaulted the Union left flank, and later in the day Gen. D. H. Hill attached the Federal right in support. Hoke’s attack fell on Col. Charles L. Upham’s brigade, which included the 15th Connecticut and 27th Massachusetts Infantry regiments, and most of the brigade was killed, wounded, or captured. Between them, Hoke and Hill seized about a thousand prisoners, the last large capture of Union troops in the war. The remnants of Upham’s command fell back east to a position in front of Wyse Fork and entrenched.

Fighting continued for the next two days. The Confederates retreated to Kinston, fell back to Goldsboro, and then took part in the Battle of Bentonville. After repairing bridges, Schofield occupied Kinston on March 19 and reached Goldsboro two days later.

The yellow sidebar in the lower right of the marker reads:
The Cobb House, to your front and right, served during the battle as the headquarters of Lt. Col. Samuel Tolles, commander of the first battalion of the 15th Connecticut Infantry. The house stood in the midst of Hoke’s attack on March 8, 1865. After the battle, the house served as a Confederate hospital,
Battle of Wyse Fork Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., October 20, 2009
3. Battle of Wyse Fork Marker
The marker is located near the Woodmen of the World parking lot.
but treated the wounded of both sides. The names of at least six Union soldiers remain written on the attic walls.
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Battlefield Trails - Civil War, and the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 13.62′ N, 77° 32.341′ W. Marker is in Kinston, North Carolina, in Lenoir County. Marker is at the intersection of New Bern Road (U.S. 70) and Woodmen Way on New Bern Road. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1893 U.S. 70, Kinston NC 28501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Battle of Wyse Fork (approx. 0.6 miles away); General Robert Hoke Monument (approx. 0.6 miles away); Confederate Headquarters (approx. 0.9 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Wyse Fork (approx. 1.6 miles away); Battle of Kinston (approx. 2.5 miles away); North Carolina (approx. 2.8 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Kinston (approx. 2.8 miles away); Foster's Raid (approx. 2.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Kinston.
 
More about this marker. This is Wyse Fork Battle Tour Stop #3. Wyse Fork Battle
Battle of Wyse Fork Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., October 20, 2009
4. Battle of Wyse Fork Marker
View is looking east down U.S. 70. The Cobb House is hidden by trees directly behind the Civil War Trails and Wyse Fork Battle Tour Stop #3 signs.
Tour Stop #2 is located a short distance west (at 1631 U.S. 70, Kinston, NC), Stop #2 marks the location of Jackson's Mill Pond, mentioned on this marker. It has no historical marker at this time.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Battle of Wyse Fork by Markers.
 
Also see . . .  The Battle of Wyse Fork History and Driving Tour Brochure. (Submitted on October 29, 2009, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Front view of the Cobb House image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., October 20, 2009
5. Front view of the Cobb House
Located across U.S. 70 and a short distance east from the marker.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,348 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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