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Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lafayette Monument

 
 
La Fayette, Immortal image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, September 9, 2007
1. La Fayette, Immortal
Inscription. La Fayette, immortal because a self-forgetful servant of justice and humanity. Beloved by all Americans because he acknowledged no duty more sacred than to fight for the freedom of his fellow men. —Woodrow Wilson

En 1777 La Fayette traversant les mers avec des volontiers français est venu apporter une aide fraternelle au peuple américain qui combattait pour sa liberté nationale. En 1917 La France combattait à son tour pour défendre sa vie et la liberté du monde. L’Amérique qui n’avait jamais oublie La Fayette a traverse les mers pour aider La France et le monde a été sauvé. —R. Poincaré

(translation) In 1777 La Fayette crossed the seas with French volunteers to bring fraternal assistance to the American people who were fighting for their national freedom. In 1917 France at war had its turn to defend its life and the freedom of the world. America, which never had forgets La Fayette, crossed the seas to help France and the world was once again safe. —R. Poincare
 
Erected 1924.
 
Location. 39° 17.835′ N, 76° 36.938′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker is at the intersection of North Charles Street and Monument Street, in the median on North Charles
Opposite Side of Monument written in French image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, September 9, 2007
2. Opposite Side of Monument written in French
Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Baltimore MD 21201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. To George Washington (here, next to this marker); A Monumental Honor (a few steps from this marker); Washington Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); The Peabody Library (within shouting distance of this marker); The Peabody Conservatory (within shouting distance of this marker); Hackerman House (within shouting distance of this marker); Mount Vernon Cultural Walk-Contributing to Society (within shouting distance of this marker); A Monumental Mistake (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Baltimore.
 
More about this marker. This 16 foot high bronze of Lafayette astride a horse on a 16 foot high marble base is by sculptor Andrew O’Connor, Jr. (1874–1941).

From the Smithsonian Institution Research Information Service: “The Lafayette Monument was the subject of one of the most contentious sculpture debates ever in Baltimore. In 1919, landscape architect, Thomas Hastings, of Carrere and Hastings, who was hired to relandscape Mt. Vernon Place decided to install the new Lafayette sculpture south of the Washington Monument where it stands
Lafayette Monument image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, September 9, 2007
3. Lafayette Monument
today. Many objected to this site because such a large sculpture and base, it was thought, would block the view of the Washington Monument from the south. Despite the criticism, Hastings prevailed and the sculpture was installed as planned on September 6, 1924, the anniversary of Lafayette’s birthday.”
 
Additional keywords. Revolutionary War patriot Gilbert Du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette
 
Categories. Notable PersonsWar, US Revolutionary
 
Lafayette in front of the Washington Monument image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
4. Lafayette in front of the Washington Monument
Lafayette Statue image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
5. Lafayette Statue
by Andrew O'Conner
General The Marquis de Lafayette image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
6. General The Marquis de Lafayette
This portrait of Lafayette by a unknown American artist hangs in the Museum of the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,887 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   5, 6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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