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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Horseshoe Shops

 
 
Horseshoe Shops Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 3, 2009
1. Horseshoe Shops Marker
Inscription. In the late 1800s, horse-drawn carts, wagons, and carriages dominated city streets, and southern agriculture still largely depended on the power of horses and mules. To meet the demand for horse and mule shoes, Tredegar began selling machine-made horseshoes in 1873. By 1887 a series of buildings for the producing horseshoes had been constructed at Tredegar in the area where you are standing.

Machine-made Horseshoes
Tredegar hired J.H. Snyder in the early 1870ís to develop machinery for making horseshoes. Tredegar began selling machine-made horseshoes in 1873, and employees Snyder, H.C. Osterbind, and Peter Greenwood all received patents for the horseshoe-making equipment.

From Laborer to Manager: The Osterbind Family
Born in Germany, Anton Osterbind joined African Americans and immigrants from the British Isles at Tredegar in the 1840s. He was a laborer who eventually became foreman. His son, Henry Carter Osterbind (pictured at right) entered the Tredegar spike mill when he was about 15 years old and eventually became the manager of several departments, including the horseshoe department.

Workers
Horseshoe Shop workers included skilled machinists, semi-skilled operators and unskilled laborers who moved the raw materials and finished products. Machinists could cut, fit,
Site of the Horseshoe Department at Tredegar image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 3, 2009
2. Site of the Horseshoe Department at Tredegar
and fabricate metal on a variety of machines; operators merely fed heated metal blanks into a single machine, which formed the horseshoe in several strokes. Most skilled and semi-skilled jobs were reserved for whites.
 
Location. 37° 32.089′ N, 77° 26.809′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker can be reached from Tredegar Street 0.1 miles west of South 5th Street. Click for map. This marker is located outside the Civil War Visitor Center at Tredegar Iron Works. Marker is at or near this postal address: 470 Tredegar Street, Richmond VA 23219, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Tredegar in the Twentieth Century / Then and Now (a few steps from this marker); Tredegar Rolling Mills (within shouting distance of this marker); Making Machines at Tredegar (within shouting distance of this marker); Whatís That? (within shouting distance of this marker); Belle Isle Prison (within shouting distance of this marker); Belle Isle and Old Dominion Iron and Nail Works (within shouting distance of this marker); Gateway to the Civil War (within shouting distance of this marker); The Bulldozer Press (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Richmond.
 
Regarding Horseshoe Shops. On the upper
Horseshoes image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 3, 2009
3. Horseshoes
left is a photograph of horseshoe-making equipment. On the lower left is a photo of Henry Carter Osterbind and a photo of the "Osterbindís home in Oregon Hill, where he owned several houses."

In the center is a diagram of Tredegar's layout based on a 1951 map.

On the right is a photograph of Tredegar workers and a photograph of the horseshoe department with the caption, "The photograph below from the World War I era shows the horseshoe department looking north from your position, including (from the left) two stock houses or warehouses, a machine shop and a forge. The stock houses had been consolidated into one building in the 1951 insurance map above. The homes in the background of the photograph are part of the neighborhood of Oregon Hill, where many Tredegar workers lived."
 
Also see . . .
1. Civil War Visitor Center at Tredegar Iron Works. Richmond National Battlefield Park (Submitted on November 6, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. The American Civil War Center at Historic Tredegar. (Submitted on November 6, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
Lines in the parking lot represent the outlines of buildings image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 8, 2009
4. Lines in the parking lot represent the outlines of buildings
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 603 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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