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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Walmer in Kent, England, United Kingdom
 

Caesar’s Invasion of Britain

 
 
Caesar’s Invasion of Britain Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, August 23, 2007
1. Caesar’s Invasion of Britain Marker
Inscription. The first Roman invasion of Britain led by Julius Caesar landed near here LV BC.
 
Location. 51° 12.668′ N, 1° 24.175′ E. Marker is in Walmer, England, in Kent. Marker can be reached from The Beach north of Cambridge Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Walmer, England CT14 7, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within 11 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Blériot's 1909 Landing Site (approx. 10.4 kilometers away).
 
More about this marker. While it’s not clear when the marker was erected, it surely commemorates the most ancient historical event in this database.
 
Regarding Caesar’s Invasion of Britain. Having conquered Gaul (France), Julius Caesar decided to take two legions of Roman soldiers (about 10,000 men) on an exploratory expedition to Britain in August, 55 BC. As his fleet came up to the now-famous white cliffs of Dover, Caesar looked for a more favorable landing spot. He sailed “seven miles” along the coast and found an “open and flat shore.” The exact location has long been disputed among historians, nautical experts, and local residents, but in 2008 a research team from Texas State University
Open and Flat Shore image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, August 23, 2007
2. Open and Flat Shore
The marker faces the English Channel at Walmer, Kent, UK, believed to be where Julius Caesar and two legions of Roman soldiers came ashore in August, 55 BC. This view looks southwest toward Dover.
led by Donald W. Olson used Caesar’s description of tidal currents and the phase of the Moon to conclude that this spot near the modern coastal towns of Walmer and Deal is, in fact, the most likely place.

High-school students usually read Caesar’s own account of the invasion in their second-year Latin classes.
 
Also see . . .
1. Sky & Telescope website. Blog item about Caesar's invasion. (Submitted on November 15, 2009, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts.) 

2. Recent study. Download a PDF from Texas State University. (Submitted on November 15, 2009, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationMilitaryNotable EventsNotable Places
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 1,304 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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