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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Katonah in Westchester County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Jay Homestead

State Historic Site

 
 
John Jay Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
1. John Jay Homestead Marker
Inscription.
The United States’ first Chief Justice, Jay, retired here after drafting New York’s first constitution and serving as President of the Continental Congress and Minister to Spain.

* Revolutionary War Heritage Trail Sites
The Revolutionary War Heritage Trail links historic sites that tell the story of New York’s decisive role in America’s fight for independence.
 
Erected by Revolutionary War Heritage Trail.
 
Location. 41° 15.042′ N, 73° 39.56′ W. Marker is in Katonah, New York, in Westchester County. Marker can be reached from Jay Street (New York State Route 22) 0.1 miles from Beaver Dam Road, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Located on the grounds of the John Jay Homestead. Marker is in this post office area: Katonah NY 10536, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Welcome to John Jay Homestead (here, next to this marker); The Homestead Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); The Sundial and Fountain Gardens (within shouting distance of this marker); The Glasshouse Complex and Herb Garden (within shouting distance of this marker); The John Jay Potting Sheds
John Jay Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 14, 2009
2. John Jay Homestead Marker
The marker is on the left.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Bedford House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Beech Allee (Avenue) and Stone Fences (within shouting distance of this marker); The Brick Lot (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Katonah.
 
Also see . . .  John Jay Homestead State Historic Site. Wikipedia article on The John Jay Homestead (Submitted on November 22, 2009, by Jeff Conner of Norfolk, Virginia.) 
 
Additional keywords. Revolutionary War Heritage Trail
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable PersonsNotable Places
 
The Main House at the John Jay Homestead image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 14, 2009
3. The Main House at the John Jay Homestead
The Main House at the John Jay Homestead image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
4. The Main House at the John Jay Homestead
The Main House at the John Jay Homestead image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
5. The Main House at the John Jay Homestead
John Jay image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 18, 2014
6. John Jay
This portrait of John Jay by Gilbert Stuart and John Trumbull hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC. It was begun in 1784 and completed in 1818.

“President George Washington chose John Jay to be the first chief justice of the United States. Jay had played an important part in negotiating the treaty bringing the Revolution to a close, and was the postwar secretary of foreign affairs. An advocate for a stronger national government, Jay had helped persuade New Yorkers to ratify the Constitution, contributing five newspaper essays to the series that became known as the Federalist Papers. In 1794, when war with England threatened, Washington sent Chief justice jay to London to defuse the crisis. The treaty that Jay negotiated, which Jeffersonian Republicans seized upon as a repudiation of America's wartime alliance with France and a return to English dominance, set off the cry of ‘Damn John Jay.’ Nonetheless, the controversial Jay Treaty avoided a war that the young republic was ill-equipped to wage.” — National Portrait Gallery.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 792 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.   6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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