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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Katonah in Westchester County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Homestead Farm

John Jay Homestead

 
 
The Homestead Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
1. The Homestead Farm Marker
Inscription.
This property has seen many changes. Over 2,200 years ago, Native Americans lived and hunted here. As the family’s tenanted farm in the 1700s, it produced wheat, rye, corn, and other grains. After Jay’s retirement and the development of the farm in the early 1800s, fruit orchards and mills were added. Jay’s descendants further diversified the farm by producing dairy products, flowers, and vegetables for the New York City markets only 50 miles away. In the 20th century, chicken farming was attempted, but Westchester County’s expanding residential development was already greatly altering the area’s agricultural nature.

The Homestead reflects the life-styles of five generations of the Jay family. It also mirrors changes that our country has experienced as it evolved from a farm-based society to a market-based economy. As you walk along today, picture the farm as it was 50, 100, or 200 years ago and envision the life of the Jays of Bedford.
 
Erected by Friends of the Jay Homestead. (Marker Number 2.)
 
Location. 41° 15.032′ N, 73° 39.542′ W. Marker is in Katonah, New York, in Westchester County. Marker can be reached from Jay Street (New York State Route 22) 0.1 miles from Beaver Dam Road when
The Homestead Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 14, 2009
2. The Homestead Farm Marker
Behind the marker are the herb garden and potting sheds.
traveling south. Click for map. Located on the grounds of the John Jay Homestead. Marker is at or near this postal address: 400 Route 22, Katonah NY 10536, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Glasshouse Complex and Herb Garden (a few steps from this marker); Welcome to John Jay Homestead (within shouting distance of this marker); John Jay Homestead (within shouting distance of this marker); The John Jay Potting Sheds (within shouting distance of this marker); The Sundial and Fountain Gardens (within shouting distance of this marker); Bedford House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Brick Lot (about 300 feet away); The Beech Allee (Avenue) and Stone Fences (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Katonah.
 
Categories. Notable PersonsSettlements & Settlers
 
John Jay image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
3. John Jay
[ detail from the marker ]
John Jay was interested in all aspects of agriculture. He was a founding member of the first national agricultural society in New York, the Society for the Promotion of Agriculture, Arts and Manufactures in 1791. His love of horticulture is well documented in his letters to his children and friends.
Tenant Farmers image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
4. Tenant Farmers
[ detail from the marker ]
“My farm was from its first settlement occupied by tenants. They have left not trees fit for rails; nor can I obtain a supply in the neighborhood. The stones they could not destroy, and they are the only materials I have for fence.”
Excerpt from a letter from John Jay to his friend Judge Richard Peters, dated November 21, 1810.
Farming image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
5. Farming
[ detail from the marker ]
“I believe that you and I derive more real satisfaction from attending to our vines and fruit trees than most conquerors do from cultivating their laurels.”
Excerpt from a letter dated February 26, 1810 from John Jay to his friend, Judge Richard Peters.
John Jay image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 18, 2014
6. John Jay
This portrait of John Jay by Gilbert Stuart and John Trumbull hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington,DC. It was begun in 1784 and completed in 1818.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 667 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.   6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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