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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Katonah in Westchester County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Glasshouse Complex and Herb Garden

John Jay Homestead

 
 
The Glasshouse Complex and Herb Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
1. The Glasshouse Complex and Herb Garden Marker
Inscription.
The design of the herb garden located here among the ruins of the old glasshouse yard is based on typical 18th- and 19th-century American and English gardens. Please enter and explore. An herb garden brochure is available in a box by the potting shed door.

Two glasshouse foundations form the north and east borders of the garden plan. From their construction early in the 19th century, these heated glasshouses were used year-round to grow vegetables, fruit, and flowers from seeds, cuttings, and bulbs.
Over the years other garden structures were added, including a grapery, a forcing house, cold frames, and hotbeds.
 
Erected by Friends of the Jay Homestead. (Marker Number 3.)
 
Location. 41° 15.031′ N, 73° 39.532′ W. Marker is in Katonah, New York, in Westchester County. Marker can be reached from Jay Street (New York State Route 22) 0.1 miles south of Beaver Dam Road, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Located on the grounds of the John Jay Homestead. Marker is at or near this postal address: 400 Route 22, Katonah NY 10536, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Homestead Farm (a few steps from this marker); The John Jay Potting Sheds
The Glasshouse Complex and Herb Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 14, 2009
2. The Glasshouse Complex and Herb Garden Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to John Jay Homestead (within shouting distance of this marker); John Jay Homestead (within shouting distance of this marker); The Sundial and Fountain Gardens (within shouting distance of this marker); The Brick Lot (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Bedford House (about 300 feet away); The Beech Allee (Avenue) and Stone Fences (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Katonah.
 
Categories. Notable PersonsNotable Places
 
The Garden Plan image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
3. The Garden Plan
[ detail from the marker ]
The herb garden was designed in 1992 by Paige Dickey, a nationally recognized garden designer and author. Established in 1993, the garden is maintained by the New York Unit of the Herb Society of America.
Potting Sheds image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
4. Potting Sheds
[ detail from the marker ]
Potting sheds ca. 1977. The shed to the left was dismantled in 1993 with the intent of reconstructing it in the future.
Herb Garden 1998 image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
5. Herb Garden 1998
[ detail from the marker ]
The potting shed to the right is the only original building that remains in the glasshouse complex. During excavation in 1993, archeologists located a previously unknown cellar in an adjoining potting shed in which were the remains of an 1830 heating system for the two glasshouses.
Aerial View image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
6. Aerial View
[ detail from the marker ]
Photographs such as this aerial one from the 1930s show the glasshouses still in use and good repair. Some of the many flowers grown by the Jays included: amaranthus, begonia, calla lily, carnation, cornflower, fuchsia, primrose, pansy, violet, and zinnia.
Glasshouse Remains image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
7. Glasshouse Remains
[ detail from the marker ]
The outline of the glasshouse that was once attached to the potting shed is visible in this photograph, ca. 1977.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 735 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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