Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Katonah in Westchester County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Brick Lot

John Jay Homestead

 
 
The Brick Lot Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
1. The Brick Lot Marker
Inscription.
When John Jay began planning his Westchester farm in the 1790s, he was fortunate to find a source of clay on his property which he used to make the brick for constructing a home and various farm buildings. Archeological testing has identified the manufacturing site where the bricks were formed, dried, stacked, and baked in kilns. During testing, the site of a temporary camp for Native Americans, which existed well before the arrival of European settlers, was located.

Thousands of bricks, created in the southern end of this field between 1787 and 1801, were used to construct John Jayís farm buildings and residence.
 
Erected by Friends of the Jay Homestead. (Marker Number 4.)
 
Location. 41° 15.08′ N, 73° 39.521′ W. Marker is in Katonah, New York, in Westchester County. Marker can be reached from Jay Street (New York State Route 22) 0.1 miles south of Beaver Dam Road, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Located on the grounds of the John Jay Homestead. Marker is at or near this postal address: 400 Route 22, Katonah NY 10536, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Farm Managerís Cottage (within shouting distance of this marker); The Organization of the Farm
The Brick Lot Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 14, 2009
2. The Brick Lot Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Bedford House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Sundial and Fountain Gardens (within shouting distance of this marker); The John Jay Potting Sheds (within shouting distance of this marker); The Stable Courtyard (within shouting distance of this marker); The Barn Complex (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Welcome to John Jay Homestead (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Katonah.
 
Categories. AgricultureNative AmericansNotable Places
 
Spruce Brook image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
3. Spruce Brook
[ detail from the marker ]
Spruce Brook flows north through the eastern edge of the Brick Lot on the opposite side of the field in front of you. Along its course John Jay placed dams and created a series of three ponds, which provided the farm with water and ice. Only one pond remains on the Homestead grounds.
The Farm Lane image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
4. The Farm Lane
[ detail from the marker ]
The farm lane, lined with horse chestnut and elm trees, serviced the farm from the Old Post Road, now called Jay Street, or Route 22. Spurs off the farm lane connected it to the carriage circle and other roads and cartways bisecting the large Jay holdings.
Windmill image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
5. Windmill
[ detail from the marker ]
The windmill at the far right in this photograph was installed by William Jay II in 1891. it was later replaced by a small stone pumphouse with an electric pump for the Homestead water supply.
Artifacts image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
6. Artifacts
[ detail from the marker ]
Artifacts dating from approximately 2,200 years ago were found in the soil beneath the late 18th century kiln area. Projectile points (or arrowheads), a flint scraper, and a quartzite rock with evidence of shaping were found near a stone hearth. Insets: chert fragment, worked chert flake, projectile point base.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 676 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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