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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Jackson in Jackson County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Scioto Salt Licks

 
 
The Scioto Salt Licks Marker (Side A) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 15, 2009
1. The Scioto Salt Licks Marker (Side A)
Inscription.
Side A:
The Scioto Salts Licks, located in and around Jackson, is an area where naturally occurring salt water, known as brine, flowed to the surface as a salt-water spring. It is known that the spring existed since the Pleistocene Ice Age because numerous bones, probably including those of mammoth and ground sloth, were excavated there. Native Americans obtained salt here for at least 8,000 years and did so until 1795 when the Treaty of Greenville separated the Native American and European populations. Early pioneer settlers utilized the licks in the second half of the eighteenth and first half of the nineteenth centuries, constructing salt furnaces that extended for four miles up and down Salt Lick Creek. Salt was a precious and necessary commodity, and the early settlers in the area profited from its trade.

Side B:
Joseph Conklin from Mason County, Kentucky, who came to this area in 1795, is credited with being the first American to establish a salt operation at the Scioto Salt Licks. Conklin was a squatter and did not own the land. In 1803, soon after Ohio became a state, the new legislature passed an act regulating salt works, thereby forbidding the state from selling salt lands. Therefore Conklin and others who followed leased the land for their salt operations. Salt production reached its peak
The Scioto Salt Licks Marker (Side B) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 15, 2009
2. The Scioto Salt Licks Marker (Side B)
between 1808-1810 with hundreds of men producing 62,000 bushels annually. Richer and more cheaply produced salt brine was discovered in what is now West Virginia. Wells sunk to reach stronger brine here proved unsuccessful. In 1826, a salt agent's legislative report stated, "The making of salt at the Scioto Salt Works has been entirely abandoned."
 
Erected 2006 by Jackson Historical Society, City of Jackson, and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 5-40.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 39° 3.159′ N, 82° 38.254′ W. Marker is in Jackson, Ohio, in Jackson County. Marker is on Main Street (Ohio Route 93), on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is next to the Round House Museum on the John Wesley Powell Plaza, west of the county courthouse, between Broadway and Portsmouth Streets. Marker is at or near this postal address: 226 E. Main Street, Jackson OH 45640, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Trails / The Kanawha Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); John Wesley Powell / Morgan's Raid in Jackson, 1863 (within shouting distance
The Scioto Salt Licks Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 15, 2009
3. The Scioto Salt Licks Marker
The Round House Museum is behind the marker.
of this marker); James Cemetery / Major John James (approx. 0.6 miles away); Leo Petroglyph (approx. 7.1 miles away); Hanging Rock Region (approx. 9.6 miles away); Buckeye Furnace (approx. 9.6 miles away); Scales (approx. 9.6 miles away); Stock Shed (approx. 9.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Jackson.
 
Also see . . .  History of the Scioto Salt Works. (Submitted on November 23, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. GovernmentIndustry & CommerceNative AmericansNatural FeaturesNatural ResourcesPolitical SubdivisionsSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,160 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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