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Poughkeepsie in Dutchess County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

River That Flows Both Ways

 
 
River That Flows Both Ways Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, May 26, 2007
1. River That Flows Both Ways Marker
Inscription. The river before you is in no hurry to reach the Atlantic Ocean. The Native Americans knew that. They called it Muhheakantuck—“river that flows both ways.”

The Hudsonís current changes direction four times every day as ocean tides pulse upriver to the Troy dam. Drop a stick in at Troy. Drifting back and forth, it will take several months to reach the ocean.

An estuary is a place where salt and fresh water mingle. Seawater entering the Hudson meets fresh water flowing from the upper river and tributaries. In the summer, you might taste a bit of salt in Newburgh, 60 miles north of New York City.

Estuaries are among the earthís most productive ecosystems. Swimming below the Hudsonís surface are 200 kinds of fish. Feasting on its riches from above are bald eagles, ducks, and herons.

Sewage discharges and destruction of wetlands once threatened this wealth of life. Anti-pollution and habitat protection measures have since turned the tide. Today the Hudson is the healthiest, most awe-inspiring estuary on the Atlantic Coast.

Let's keep it that
Hudson River and Mid Hudson Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, May 26, 2007
2. Hudson River and Mid Hudson Bridge
way.

Taking the Measure of the Estuary
The Hudson flows 315 miles from Lake Tear of the Clouds in the Adirondacks to the Upper Bay of New York Harbor. It is an estuary for the 153 miles from Troy to the Bay, which extends another seven miles to the Narrows and the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge between Brooklyn and Staten Island.

The Hudsonís width ranges from about 500 feet at Troy to three and a half miles at Haverstraw. It is deepest at West Point—216 feet according to a 1934 survey. Depths change with the tides; water levels at high tide are three to five feet above the low tide levels.

(Text of Adjacent fish-shaped marker) Striped bass #32057 was tagged on May 12, 1989 in the Hudson River near Kingston, 90 miles north of New York City. ē How many miles did it swim before it was recaptured?
 
Location. 41° 42.385′ N, 73° 56.423′ W. Marker is in Poughkeepsie, New York, in Dutchess County. Marker can be reached from Water Street near Main Street. Click for map. Markers are on the shore of the Hudson River in the
Cruise boat providing tours image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, May 26, 2007
3. Cruise boat providing tours
Victor Waryas Park. The park is adjacent to the Poughkeepsie train station. Marker is in this post office area: Poughkeepsie NY 12601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Victor C. Waryas Memorial Park (within shouting distance of this marker); The Queen City of the Hudson (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Walkway Over the Hudson (about 600 feet away); Walkway Loop Trail (about 600 feet away); Thomas Dongan (approx. 0.3 miles away); Poughkeepsie-Highland Bridge (approx. 0.4 miles away); Constitution Ratification Site (approx. 0.6 miles away); On This Site (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Poughkeepsie.
 
Categories. EnvironmentNatural FeaturesNatural Resources
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 4,171 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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