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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Collier

“I never saw such a sight”

 
 
Fort Collier Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
1. Fort Collier Marker
Inscription. Confederate troops constructed Fort Collier in 1861 after the evacuation of Harpers Ferry. The earthworks, which surrounded the Benjamin Stine house here, commanded the approach to Winchester on the Martinsburg and Winchester Turnpike. The fort saw little action until late in the afternoon on September 19, 1864, when, during the Third Battle of Winchester, it became a focal point of the engagement. Here a great Union cavalry charge led by Gen. Wesley Merritt turned the battle against Gen. Jubal A. Earlyís outnumbered Confederates. The charge was earthshaking and memorable. A Confederate infantryman who survived the attack later wrote, “I never saw such a sight in my life as that of the tremendous force, the flying banners, sparkling bayonets and flashing sabers moving from the north and east upon the left flank and rear of our army.”

The Stine house was destroyed in the battle. The present day dwelling, still largely surrounded by the Confederate earthworks, was built in 1867.
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 12.077′ N, 78° 9.296′ W. Marker is near Winchester, Virginia, in Frederick
Fort Collier Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 28, 2007
2. Fort Collier Marker
County. Marker is at the intersection of Martinsburg Pike (U.S. 11) and Brooke Road (Route 1322), on the right when traveling north on Martinsburg Pike. Click for map. At the west side entrance to Fort Collier Civil War Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 922 Martinsburg Pike, Winchester VA 22601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Fort Collier (within shouting distance of this marker); George Washington in Winchester (within shouting distance of this marker); 2nd Battle of Winchester (within shouting distance of this marker); 3rd Battle of Winchester (within shouting distance of this marker); Lt. Collierís Earthworks (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Fort Collier (about 400 feet away); Third Battle of Winchester (about 500 feet away); The Cavalry Charge at Fort Collier (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Winchester.
 
More about this marker. The center of the marker shows, “Thulstrupís dramatic canvas depicted the decisive blow of the Third Battle of Winchester, September 19, 1864. The cavalry charge struck Fort Collier late that afternoon and unhinged the Confederate line of defense that extended from here, south to the Berryville Turnpike.”

A portrait of Gen. Merritt
Close Up View of the Painting image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
3. Close Up View of the Painting
is captioned, “Gen. Wesley Merritt (1834–1910) commanded the 1st Cavalry Division, Army of the Shenandoah.”

A second portrait is of “Milton W. Humphreys (1844–1928), Confederate artilleryman at Fort Collier and later Professor of Ancient Languages at the University of Virginia.”

A map details the tactical situation at the later stages of the battle.
 
Regarding Fort Collier. Four additional interpretive markers at the Fort Collier site detail the history and layout of the fort.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Collier Civil War Center. (Submitted on September 13, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. Opequon or Third Winchester. Battle Summary from the National Park Service. The action at Fort Collier is covered under phase 9 of the battle. (Submitted on September 13, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Close Up View of the Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
4. Close Up View of the Map
Fort Collier West Side Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
5. Fort Collier West Side Entrance
The rise just behind the marker are the remains of the fortification. The reconstructed Stine house stands beyond the fortifications.
The Interior of Fort Collier image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
6. The Interior of Fort Collier
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,439 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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